Parties on File

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Boiler Room knows what you did last night.

The Best Day of Bob Geldof’s Life

In this film by Errol Morris, the Irish Rocker talks about the formation of the charity supergroup Band Aid.

The Wrath of the Laugh: An Interview with Wayne White

By the time you read this, Wayne White’s Invisible Ruler will be closed. The exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery was Wayne’s return to NYC, and an outstanding success. Earlier this week, we caught up with Wayne in Los Angeles and proceeded to talk about life, art, and his life in art.

 
TWBE: Let’s start from the beginning. You grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when did you first discover art?

Wayne White: That’s a tough question. I guess I discovered art in drawing, and that’s one of my earliest memories. I discovered drawing just on my own as every kid does. I didn’t know it was called art and I didn’t really know what an artist was for a long time. There were no galleries or museums or any culture around when I was kid at that time. I came to it naturally from just a love of drawing and of course as I grew I learned about art history and artists and everything. My mother was where I got my biggest influence from. She was the artistic one in the family and loved to decorate, collect antiques and stuff. So she knew a little bit about art. When I was a little bitty kid I remember her saying, “Well Wayne could be a commercial artist one day.” She’d say that to adults, I overheard her because she didn’t say it directly to me. I would sit there as a little kid and I would imagine an artist that comes on between TV shows on the commercial and he’s standing there painting a portrait and it’s a commercial you know… (Laughter). And you get a smock – I remember it as clear as a bell. The vision I had in my head. You’ve got a smock on and there’s a pedestal with a bowl of fruit on it and an easel. It’s a commercial of a guy painting. I thought that’s what a commercial artist was.
 
So from there you went to art school and studied abstract painting at a college in Tennessee?

Yeah as I grew in Chattanooga, I went to high school and stuff and I was the school artist and a cartoonist on the school newspapers. That’s what I originally wanted to be as a kid was a cartoonist because that was my idea of an artist. And then I went to Middle Tennessee State University and I majored in painting because I just thought that painting was a serious thing to do. It’s what real artist did. I took four years of painting and art history and stuff, and that’s where I really learned about the art world and the history of art. The history part of it was just as important as the actual doing of it because that was a great education for me. Just learning about the past. I studied abstract – my painting teacher was an abstract expressionist. That was my first serious foray into painting, abstract painting.
 
You never strayed from that at all? You never tried to paint cartoons or anything?

Well, I kept drawing underground cartoons for the college newspaper and I always had an interest in cartoons. And my abstract paintings had a very cartoony line and I was interested in finding the gap between abstract paintings and cartoons which they share a lot, and I was a big fan of Phillip Guston and Willem de Kooning who both had very cartoony lines. Cartoons were never very far from my mind and then the minute that I graduated from four years of that abstract expressionism and everything, I got back into comics because I saw Raw Magazine and I knew this was the next generation for undergrounds. It was full of exciting great art and Raw Magazine is what got me convinced to become a cartoonist again. It inspired me to move to New York City.
 
What year was that?

It was 1980 when I first saw Raw. I was in Nashville where I lived for a year after I graduated.
 
When did you move to New York?

I didn’t get to New York until January of ’82. I spent another year in Nashville saving my dough (laughs) and then I made the leap. And in 1982 it was pretty rough and ready you know. I lived downtown in the East Village and it was still pretty funky, but it was a great time for the arts. A time when a young artist could afford to live in Manhattan and it was New York City so it was great. It was very exciting. It was my best education.
 

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Nu Liife

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Our weekly comic by Andrew Jeffrey Wright / @ajw4ever

Keeping Busy Creating

“Cody Hudson & The Art of the Side Hustle” a 2-part documentary by Jared Eberhard for Vans.

Cody Hudson has a day job as a graphic designer and is also a creative collaborator with several independent brands. He discusses a need to create art even if no one sees it. Cody tours his studio and the city of Chicago, highlighting examples of his favorite work.

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Linked Out

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Every week Chris Black uses his superior internet reading abilities to provide you with a list of links to things that you’re bound to find interesting
 
Oxford Scientist Explains the Physics of Playing Electric Guitar Solos

Why Art Galleries are Moving Back into Domestic Settings

Map Shows Raymond Chandler’s Real And Fictitious L.A.

How Do I Avoid ‘The iTunes Pit Of Despair’?

Great Assignments: LIFE Photographers Look Back

The Contrarians on Stress: It Can Be Good for You

The Cult Of The Leica Camera

Provocations of a Bad Jingle Writer

Highbrow House Cocktails That Aim Too High

How To Intimidate People

The Manhattan Apartment that’s the Farthest from any Subway

 

— Chris Black / @donetodeath

 

Friday’s Vault

Jeremy Klein in the Birdhouse “Ravers” video (1993)

That’s Mr. Soul Glo To You

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Rest in Perm goes out to black hair-care entrepreneur Comer Cottrell, who turned the jheri curl (as worn by Lionel Richie, above) into an affordable hair style by bringing it into the home in the form of cheap kits targeted at adults and kids alike. He was 82 years old.

(Thanks Rog!)

Batman, Forever

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The 75th Anniversary stamp set that will briefly prolong the perpetual slow death of the great US postal service. It’ll be pretty awesome to send bills out with the Bat-Signal though.

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The Wheatpasting Man With a Porsche Cayenne

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After going All City again, COST got busted the other night on the westside. And as evidenced by their freaking press release and terrible clothing, the NYPD couldn’t be prouder.

Meanwhile in Australia…

“But those people keep a movin’ And that’s what tortures me…”

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With an overpass designed to look like Folsom Prison’s east gate guard towers, the newly-opened $3.8 million Johnny Cash Trail will take pedestrians and bicyclists on a continuous 2.5 mile journey outside the prison walls and across its grounds—from Folsom’s City Hall to the town’s large lake, north of the prison.

The Wide World of Weed

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Pot News for Those Who Partake
 
In regards to unimportant questions: Did cannabis make The Beatles’ ‘Rubber Soul’ worse?

After that, here’s A look at Marijuana through the years

Los Angeles keeps innovating: 420 Nurses is a social network and photo studio for pot smoking “models” trying to make a dollar

While in Denver, these ladies are doing it different: Cannabrand, an advertising agency devoted exclusively to marketing marijuana

Meanwhile on the East Coast, “Stoners trade tie-dye T-shirts for Wall Street suits”

And in Jamaica, an obvious story: Rastas ready for ganja decriminalization
 

 

The Line

Saul Steinberg’s 404-inch drawing from 1954 comes to life in this video trailer for a new Nieves publication

Camila Morrone is…

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Wednesday’s Muse

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420 Pages of Funny Drawings by Jay Howell

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You’ve probably watched at least 420 minutes of his drawings on television, so repeatedly flipping through all of the pages in Jay Howell’s new art book should be an enjoyable breeze for you. Titled “Punks Git Cut: A Zine Anthology by Jay Howell” it’s just one of the many rad new publications that Last Gasp is kickstarting for their fall new season of books. Pre-order today and impress your friends tomorrow

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Reminisce Over This

Limp Bizkit Ft. Method Man, N Together Now, 1999

“When I’m driving, I definitely can’t do that math”

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Launched as a pilot program “aimed to convince Americans to adopt the system of measure in use across much of the rest of the world,” Interstate 19 in Arizona is the only continuous stretch of highway in the United States that uses the metric system. As you can guess, the Carter administration program failed because America is still waiting on the rest of world to adopt the US customary system.

TWIN PEAKS: 25 Years Later

Are Andy and Lucy still a clueless happy couple? Is Agent Bob Cooper still chilling at the Black Lodge? And how are Audrey and Shelly holding up now that they are in their 40s? These might be some of the questions that are answered when David Lynch’s Twin Peaks returns to the small (yet remarkably bigger) screen in 2016 on Showtime. Celebrate with a cup of coffee, because you probably need one anyway.

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