Stay Puft!

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For the 30th anniversary of Ghostbusters, Legacy Recordings is releasing a limited edition 12″ “Stay Puft Super Deluxe Edition Vinyl” featuring Ray Parker Jr.’s No. 1 hit single “Ghostbusters” and Run-DMC’s “Ghostbusters” rap from the sequel. The real gem of this all is the packaging, which is basically a marshmallow, or technically a puffy gatefold jacket simulating the feel, texture, and smell of a marshmallow. Pre-order here

Portrait of a Drone

Richard Mosse (of infrared photography fame) directed this short “Death Is Elsewhere” on the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Featuring the X-47B drone in maneuvers on the aircraft carrier, it’s an up close look at the beautiful design of one of the pilotless killers.

The Skin Stays

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The Foundation for the Art and Science of Tattooing is a one-year old project that focuses on preserving willing participants tattoos after they’ve passed away. By essentially turning plots of skin into plastic, the foundation aims to immortalize the art form.

The image above was cut from a 19th-Century Polish prisoner after they were deceased.

Ill Investigations

Bill Hader brings back “Inside SoCal” for another episode on SNL

Koudlam – The Landsc Apes (EP Stream)

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KOUDLAM’s new album “Benidorm Dream” came out on Pan European Recordings yesterday. This is his EP from earlier this summer.

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“Always Leave Them Wanting More”

The Mystery of Morganna: The Kissing Bandit

Never Miss A Beat…

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Pole Position Sports Bar in Tacoma, Washington is situated right next to a strip club called Fox’s. Since visitors are not allowed to drink in nudie bars in Washington State, the bathroom architects at Pole Position made a legendary move by adding a peephole above one of the urinals in the men’s restroom. Thereby enabling imbibing patrons to gaze straight into the flesh den, and in turn solidifying its status as one of the best bar bathrooms in the world.

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Beware the Red-Eyed Tiger

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Matt Leines just made this really cool six color embroidered Tiger Head patch. It can be yours for the low price of $6.00

For the Crosstown Commute Through Central Park

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Polo Ralph Lauren’s outdoor-inspired Leather-trim attaché bag

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The Affected

A Brief History of Melancholy

Spiders “bleeding out of the walls”

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Imagine if your house was filled with close to 6000 brown recluse spiders. Open a cabinet, there’s a spider. Get into bed, spider under your comforter. Check on the baby, spider in the crib. Taking a shower, spider hovering down from above. This was one Missouri family’s nightmare two years ago when the house they purchased became grossly infested with the venomous brown recluse. Now in classic American form, the arachnophobic family that abandoned the home are suing the previous owners for not disclosing the 48,000 legged problem.

Brain Lapse

Jake Fried returns with another hand-drawn experimental animation using ink, white-out, coffee and collage.

Parties on File

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Boiler Room knows what you did last night.

The Best Day of Bob Geldof’s Life

In this film by Errol Morris, the Irish Rocker talks about the formation of the charity supergroup Band Aid.

The Wrath of the Laugh: An Interview with Wayne White

By the time you read this, Wayne White’s Invisible Ruler will be closed. The exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery was Wayne’s return to NYC, and an outstanding success. Earlier this week, we caught up with Wayne in Los Angeles and proceeded to talk about life, art, and his life in art.

 
TWBE: Let’s start from the beginning. You grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when did you first discover art?

Wayne White: That’s a tough question. I guess I discovered art in drawing, and that’s one of my earliest memories. I discovered drawing just on my own as every kid does. I didn’t know it was called art and I didn’t really know what an artist was for a long time. There were no galleries or museums or any culture around when I was kid at that time. I came to it naturally from just a love of drawing and of course as I grew I learned about art history and artists and everything. My mother was where I got my biggest influence from. She was the artistic one in the family and loved to decorate, collect antiques and stuff. So she knew a little bit about art. When I was a little bitty kid I remember her saying, “Well Wayne could be a commercial artist one day.” She’d say that to adults, I overheard her because she didn’t say it directly to me. I would sit there as a little kid and I would imagine an artist that comes on between TV shows on the commercial and he’s standing there painting a portrait and it’s a commercial you know… (Laughter). And you get a smock – I remember it as clear as a bell. The vision I had in my head. You’ve got a smock on and there’s a pedestal with a bowl of fruit on it and an easel. It’s a commercial of a guy painting. I thought that’s what a commercial artist was.
 
So from there you went to art school and studied abstract painting at a college in Tennessee?

Yeah as I grew in Chattanooga, I went to high school and stuff and I was the school artist and a cartoonist on the school newspapers. That’s what I originally wanted to be as a kid was a cartoonist because that was my idea of an artist. And then I went to Middle Tennessee State University and I majored in painting because I just thought that painting was a serious thing to do. It’s what real artist did. I took four years of painting and art history and stuff, and that’s where I really learned about the art world and the history of art. The history part of it was just as important as the actual doing of it because that was a great education for me. Just learning about the past. I studied abstract – my painting teacher was an abstract expressionist. That was my first serious foray into painting, abstract painting.
 
You never strayed from that at all? You never tried to paint cartoons or anything?

Well, I kept drawing underground cartoons for the college newspaper and I always had an interest in cartoons. And my abstract paintings had a very cartoony line and I was interested in finding the gap between abstract paintings and cartoons which they share a lot, and I was a big fan of Phillip Guston and Willem de Kooning who both had very cartoony lines. Cartoons were never very far from my mind and then the minute that I graduated from four years of that abstract expressionism and everything, I got back into comics because I saw Raw Magazine and I knew this was the next generation for undergrounds. It was full of exciting great art and Raw Magazine is what got me convinced to become a cartoonist again. It inspired me to move to New York City.
 
What year was that?

It was 1980 when I first saw Raw. I was in Nashville where I lived for a year after I graduated.
 
When did you move to New York?

I didn’t get to New York until January of ’82. I spent another year in Nashville saving my dough (laughs) and then I made the leap. And in 1982 it was pretty rough and ready you know. I lived downtown in the East Village and it was still pretty funky, but it was a great time for the arts. A time when a young artist could afford to live in Manhattan and it was New York City so it was great. It was very exciting. It was my best education.
 

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Nu Liife

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Our weekly comic by Andrew Jeffrey Wright / @ajw4ever

Keeping Busy Creating

“Cody Hudson & The Art of the Side Hustle” a 2-part documentary by Jared Eberhard for Vans.

Cody Hudson has a day job as a graphic designer and is also a creative collaborator with several independent brands. He discusses a need to create art even if no one sees it. Cody tours his studio and the city of Chicago, highlighting examples of his favorite work.

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Linked Out

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Every week Chris Black uses his superior internet reading abilities to provide you with a list of links to things that you’re bound to find interesting
 
Oxford Scientist Explains the Physics of Playing Electric Guitar Solos

Why Art Galleries are Moving Back into Domestic Settings

Map Shows Raymond Chandler’s Real And Fictitious L.A.

How Do I Avoid ‘The iTunes Pit Of Despair’?

Great Assignments: LIFE Photographers Look Back

The Contrarians on Stress: It Can Be Good for You

The Cult Of The Leica Camera

Provocations of a Bad Jingle Writer

Highbrow House Cocktails That Aim Too High

How To Intimidate People

The Manhattan Apartment that’s the Farthest from any Subway

 

— Chris Black / @donetodeath

 

Friday’s Vault

Jeremy Klein in the Birdhouse “Ravers” video (1993)

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