The Novel Idea: Hassan Rahim

Konx-Om-Pax

For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. Last time, Brian Scott Campbell selected A Figure In Hiding, and this time Hassan Rahim selected Konx om Pax: Essays in Light byAleister Crowley.I chose this book because upon researching Aleister Crowley novels, I was immediately drawn to the bold typographic cover,” Hassan explains. “I later discovered that the insane font treatment was actually designed by Crowley himself after smoking hashish, despite looking like a professional typographer’s hand. I think that small detail attracted me more to his work altogether.”

Zio / @zioxla

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The Novel Idea: Brian Scott Campbell

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For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. Last time, Robert Meinhardt chose Hell’s Angels, and this time Brian Scott Campbell selected A Figure In Hiding by Franklin W. Dixon. “I remember checking out Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew from the library when I was a kid, and loved the covers for The Tower Treasure, and The Secret Of Skull Mountain,” Brian explains. “I was considering several possible books for the project, including many of the Choose Your Own Adventure novels, but the covers were almost too good to re-interpret. I settled on working with the Hardy Boys, A Figure In Hiding. I love the matter-of-fact quality of the title for this book. I usually start with a title for my work, or a list of words, but it’s never poetic, it’s more of a directive. I chose this book because I thought the figure looked like a peeping Tom, which is really fucking weird considering he looks like a boy scout, and is rendered in a pulp magazine style. Maybe my work always deals with this idea of a hidden figure, but in a slightly less literal way.”

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The Novel Idea: Robert Meinhardt

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For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. Last time, KC Ortiz chose The Count of Monte Cristo, and this time Robert Meinhardt selected Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga by Hunter S. Thompson. “I read true crime novels almost exclusively,” Robert says. “For whatever reason fiction doesn’t have the power to hold my attention long enough to enjoy finishing a book. Crime and criminals have always been a main interest of mine since I was a young child. What made Hunter S. Thompson’s novel such a joy to read was his eloquent prose and sardonic descriptions of true crime material. For me, it was the best of both worlds.”

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The Novel Idea: KC Ortiz

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For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. Last time, Devin Troy Strother chose Island of the Blue Dolphins, and this time KC Ortiz selected The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.I first read The Count of Monte Cristo at a pretty young age, maybe 12 or 13, and it had a heavy influence on me at the time,” KC explains. “It’s a great classic novel and read, but it’s also full of interesting takeaways that molded my thinking on a number of things, or at least helped me gain an understanding of people and humanity. The system doesn’t work and you have to do things on your own outside of whatever system you are living in, greed is everywhere and will make petty people do horrible things, but you can live outside of all that and by your own laws and system. The world can be cruel and evil but there is always hope. The Count also takes his time with his revenge, there’s no rush as it will all come together in time, so I think the book also helped me gain an appreciation of patience and thinking things through and not just wilding out. Dumas gets into some religious themes at the end but I’d say that part always escaped me, however, there is still truth in the fact that not everything is controllable by you or man in general. I just don’t think God is the reason for that. As in almost all cases, the movies don’t come close to touching what the book offers. It’s a heavy book but well worth the read and if one doesn’t want to bother reading the whole book there is at least one lesson that everyone can learn from the movies as well: Where there is a will there is a way.”

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The Novel Idea: Devin Troy Strother

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For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. Last time, Mark Mulroney chose 120 Days of Sodom, and this time Devin Troy Strother selected Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell. “The reason why I picked Island of the Blue Dolphins is because my parents have it on one of their bookshelves that faces the room I grew up in,” Devin explains. “So I’ve been staring at the front cover of that book for years. I didn’t even read it; I think I read the CliffsNotes version. I don’t really remember what the fuck it’s about, all I know is that there’s no fuckin’ dolphins in the book, and it was a huge let down! Honestly, when you asked me to do this project, the first thought that came into my head was like, I wanna paint some fuckin’ dolphins tho. Fuckin’ island of the blue nose dolphins, man it’s going down.”

 

The Novel Idea: Mark Mulroney

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For our new series, “The Novel Idea,” we are asking artists to re-create the covers of their favorite books. To start this series, Mark Mulroney chose 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade. “This is not a great book,” Mark says. “The characters are not developed very well and there is absolutely no arc to the story. In fact, I have never read the entire book but that is why I like it. It requires no commitment whatsoever. You can pick it up, flip to any page you like, and just start reading and then stop wherever you like and flip backwards or forwards to another part of the book and start reading again. This book is an exhaustive list of imaginary scenes of human sexuality and cruelty. Sure, it’s often yucky and horrific, but there are not many books out there that describe how some cruddy old man likes to drink wine after it has been poured out of a whore’s filthy asshole.”