In the Studio of Tomokazu Matsuyama

 
Location: Greenpoint, Brooklyn
 
How long have you been in this studio?

Just over a year now.
 
Why did you pick the location?

Because I’ve been in Greenpoint for 12 years, and I love it and can’t get out of here.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

It’s a few times the scale of my last studio. The building is organized and run a lot better. All in all, just a better circumstance.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

It’s large and has 15 ft tall ceilings, but more so, I love the view. It’s right against the East river and at the very tip of Greenpoint. My eyes are filled with views of Manhattan and Queens.
 
How often are you in here?

Always. I have a house near the studio, but I’m hardly ever there.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

We can basically do everything. I have a full staffed studio, so all of my operations are pretty much run here with the exception of the sculptures, as I need an engineer and professional fabricator to help my production.
 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

Yeah. This summer I had nearly 10 people on staff including interns, so I have no clue what’s in it. I don’t bother to try to use it, as it was always full.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

A Bose speaker that connects directly to my Mac, and a Bluetooth Sony speaker for the painting side of the space.
 
Have you ever slept here?

Countless times. However, I try not to now as I have a house very close by, and I’m married, so the wife needs me back home.
 
 
On August 15th, Matsu will debut his largest sculpture to date, Sky Is The Limit, at Harbour City Hong Kong. You can follow him on instagram at @tomokazumatsuyama
 

In the Studio of Erin M. Riley

 
Location: Bushwick, Brooklyn
 
How long have you been in this studio?

Since October 2013.
 
Why did you pick the location?

I was in Philly and my building was being shut down by L&I and this space was opening up. It was my excuse to move to Brooklyn finally. I’m glad I did because the Philly studio was locked for months.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

My previous studio was twice as big and 4x less expensive. Haha. It ruled, huge windows, nice view. My studio before that was tiny in Chinatown in Philly so I shared it with lots of little mice, and before that I was in grad school. I’ve been to a bunch of residencies and nothing compares to those studios. Currently on the hunt for a new space.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

I like the location and it’s quiet.
 
How often are you in here?

I am here every day.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

I have two floor looms here, I spend most days hand weaving tapestries on them. Other days I dye yarn, set up the warp, do hand sewing, drawing or a million other in-between tasks.
 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

In the summer I am all about ice, for ice coffee and water. So tons of ice, lunch for the day, fruit, some almond milk, tons of snacks.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

I don’t have a sound system I just use my laptop with earbuds. My studio mate has one but I don’t use it. My looms make noise when I’m actively weaving but are quiet when I’m just sitting so having earphones helps the sounds get straight to my ears at the most appropriate volume.
 
Have you ever slept here?

Yep, if I am there late enough and have to be back early the next day.
 
 
Erin will be showing new work this Thursday (7/17) in the Summer Mixer 2014 at Joshua Liner Gallery. You can follow her on twitter and instagram at @erinmriley
 

In the Studio of Faile

 
Location: Greenpoint, Brooklyn
 
How long have you been in this studio?

2 years.
 
Why did you pick the location?

The studio found us.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

We would give it a blue ribbon at the State Fair if there were a category for studio ranks.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

The openness of the space, its functionality and the ability to handle large-scale works.
 
How often are you in here?

Five days a week.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

We handle everything in house with the exception of molten metals and toxic resins. Most of the work in studio is focussed on printmaking and painting. Many assemblage works and a variety of sculpture.
 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

Yes we do. A few random beers and some forgotten lunch items from the staff.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

We have a nice little Decco amp in the main studio – forget the speakers offhand. In the smaller office/image making part of the studio we have a great set of Orb speakers that work well.
 
Have you ever slept here?

Yes on several occasions.
 
 
On July 2nd, Faile presents a new body of work titled Fuel, Fantasy, Freedom at Gallery Hilger NEXT in Vienna, Austria. The exhibition will continue through September 6th, 2014. Faile can be followed @faileart on twitter and instagram

In The Studio of Buff Monster

 
How long have you been in this studio?

Only about a month. It always takes much longer than imagine to set up a work space, but it’s good. I’ve been making work in here for a little while now.
 
Why did you pick the location?

My buddies Sucklord and Lamour Supreme had a space nearby and they were going to move into this building, so I started checking out the units in here. All these studio spaces are brand new; when I first came in here, these walls weren’t even up.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

I’ve been working in Brooklyn, and it was great, but I just needed more space. My painting studio in LA was bigger, but this spot is way better. I like my studio space to be inconvenient for visitors and very low-key, so now being in the middle of everything is something new for me.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

Having two big windows right on Bowery is awesome.
 
How often are you in here?

A Lot! I’m usually here for a few long full days in a row, then I’ll head back to my office in Brooklyn to handle all the other non-art-making things I gotta do. Then I’m back here for another few days in a row.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

I really want to get the space to a point where I can make much bigger paintings than I’ve been able to do recently. But I’m very busy getting the second series of The Melty Misfits together. All those paintings are small. I’m also set up to do a bunch of resin casting. And besides all that, I have a nice gallery/showroom space in the front, which is perfect for client meetings and product releases.

 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

I got a small fridge. It’s got a few things in it, but it’s mostly full of Perrier.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

I just a tiny boombox. It’s so important for me to have heavy metal blasting when I’m working, but I’ve never had a great sound system. I also listen to the Adam Carolla podcast for hours and hours when I’m doing really tedious work, and this thing works for that too!
 
Have you ever slept here?

My lovely girlfriend lives a 3-minute-walk away, so there’s no need to sleep here!
 
 
Buff Monster will be opening up his studio (THE MELTY MANOR: 144 Bowery, 3rd Floor) from noon to 4pm this Saturday, June 21st for a print release. He can be followed @buffmonster on twitter and instagram, and /buffmonster on facebook.

In the Studio of Hiro Kurata

 
How long have you been in this studio?

Since October last year (2013).
 
Why did you pick the location?

It’s sort of close from my apartment and the rent is quite cheap compared to other studios in the city. Red Hook still has the atmosphere of everything not being so gentrified, so I’m in love with this neighborhood. The down part is the convenience of transportation isn’t too good. It’s a problem when it rains or snows because I bike here.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

I’m still figuring that out. I like the fact that I’ve separated my studio and my apartment since I’ve always worked from my apartment. It was really convenient to live and work in the same spot because of many reasons, but I guess it was time for me to separate the two. The winter we had here in Brooklyn this year was pretty horrible and this studio here gets really cold because it’s an old concrete building. I was wearing layers of clothes while I was here, thinking how nice it was working from home. The spring is becoming much easier to work and I’m staring to like this place more.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

The lighting from the window is perfect. During the day, I usually don’t turn on the lights and work with natural light, which feels good.
 
How often are you in here?

3-4 days a week. I have a few part time jobs with some weird schedules so whenever I have time, I escape here.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

Mainly a painting studio. Since I have three clean walls, I can work on three different paintings at once. The best part of having a studio is I can do messy things and not care about it.
 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

I don’t have one, so I keep few bottles of water and bring my own tea from home.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

Headphones, or raw sound from computer speakers.
 
Have you ever slept here?

I’ve taken a nap here, but never a serious one… yet.
 
 
Hiro has a new book which will be released next month from Anteism, and in conjunction with the book release, he will be in Victoria, Canada to exhibit in their truck gallery and paint the exterior of the truck. For more information on Hiro’s artwork, visit his website www.shiloku.com/

In the Studio of Eric Elms

How long have you been in this studio?

I’ve been in this studio for about 2 years. When I first moved in it was a total mess so it took a couple months and a lot of DIY to get it whipped into a proper studio.
 
Why’d you pick the location?

I live in the area so it is important for me to be able to walk to work with my dog everyday. Plus it makes it easier to come back for night sessions.
 
How does it rank in comparison to your previous studios?

Best one so far. I’ve been pretty lucky with studio spaces in NY. I always try and find the hidden gems, but that is getting harder and harder these days.
 
What’s your favorite attribute of the space?

The tall ceilings and the fact that it is a building by itself. I got no one on top or below me telling me what to do. Ground level is always the best for a studio spot.
 
If you had to use one word to describe the studio, what would it be?

Fun
 
How often are you in here?

For sure everyday during the week. I try and avoid it at least for a day on the weekends but a lot of times I end up popping in and check things out.
 
Can you explain the full capabilities of the studio? What kind of things do you make?

I kind of make whatever I want in here. I have my desks upstairs where I take care of any computer/design work, photocopying or vinyl work. Downstairs I kind of divide it up between painting, woodshop and bookmaking spaces. Areas definitely get blurred depending on what I am working on. Usually I am just painting downstairs and making panels or stretchers in the woodshop.
 
Do you have a refrigerator? If so, what’s in it?

I have a fridge. Right now it is in party-mode. Mostly just dog-food in the freezer and beers in the fridge. I had people over a few months back and ended up with like a 100 beers after the night was over cause everyone brought tons of drinks. I’ve been trying to get rid of them slowly.
 
What kind of sound system do you have?

Nothing major. Just a regular receiver and a couple bose speakers. Also an appletv so I can play anything off my phone. A lot of times I will just throw on headphones so I can zone out though.
 
Have you ever slept here?

I’ve taken some naps in the hammock but no full on sleep seshes. Maybe if I lived further away I would be more tempted to crash here. Buster crashes out during the day all the time though.
 

Eric Elms is a New York-based artist. He can be followed on instagram at @elmselms

In The Studio of Sam Friedman

Sam Friedman is an artist whose work we’ve always been appreciative of. In anticipation of his show at Kinfolk’s new space tonight (4/18), we dipped inside his studio to get a look at where he creates and talked a little bit of art with him.

 
So… when did you move into this studio?

I moved into my studio in June 2012.
 
Let’s say you meet a person and tell them you’re an artist. They ask you “what kind of art do you make?” You say…?

I make paintings.
 
When did you first consider yourself an artist? Do you remember making things as a kid?

I was always drawing and making things as a kid, and have considered myself an artist for as long I was old enough to have an identity.
 
Your dad helps you make canvases, right?

Yeah, he has been making a lot of my panels for over a decade now.
 
All of these paintings are very tropical, which is a really cool thing these days. How long have you been making paintings incorporating this trendy theme? How’d you decide on it?

Hahahaha. I try not to make them tropical, but I do paint beaches. All of mine are based off the northeast, so your not going to find a palm tree or anything. I started painting beaches in August of 2008 after watching a storm roll in to the Rockaways at sunset on my wife’s birthday. In the moment, the scene reminded me of the abstract paintings I was doing at the time, so I just took the same language and made a landscape painting the next week.

[Read more]

In the Studio of Peter Sutherland

In the Studio of Taylor McKimens

Taylor McKimens is a Brooklyn-based artist whose work has been shown around the globe, and on this website. His vibrant, organic paintings are some of our favorites.

In The Studio of Devin Troy

This week, we visited the studio of artist Devin Troy Strother, who is preparing for his third solo exhibition at Richard Heller Gallery in Los Angeles. Devin uses glitter, paper and paint to create mixed-media collages that open a dialogue between him and the viewer. His exhibition, Look at All My Shit, opens on September 7.

Photography by Brigitte Sire

In the Studio of Chuck Webster

New York artist Chuck Webster opens up an enormous solo show next week (9/5) at Betty Cunningham Gallery in Chelsea. We stopped by his Greenpoint studio for a visit.

Roy Lichtenstein in his Studio

Photos taken by Laurie Lambrecht between 1990 and 1993.

Inside The Studio of Ron Mueck

Photographs by Gautier Deblonde

Ron Mueck opens a new exhibition today at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain. It is on view through September 29th.

[Read more]

In the Studio of Madsteez

We recently visited the Costa Mesa studio of MADSTEEZ. Known for his bold artwork, Mr. Ween’s workspace is as colorful as the artist himself.

In The Studio of Andrew Schoultz

A couple weeks ago we visited the studio of San Francisco-based artist Andrew Schoultz. Here’s a peek into what we saw.

In The Studio of Eddie Martinez

Brooklyn-based painter Eddie Martinez opens a new show, Seeker, in about a half an hour at Peres Projects in Berlin. We stopped by his studio last month to hang out and see some of the work before it got shipped. Here it is.

Reyes, Steel, and Amandalynn

While in SF last month, I had the opportunity to visit the studio space of those three talented artists mentioned in the headline.

In The Studio of Richard Colman

Richard Colman is a San Francisco-based artist who I’ve been fortunate enough to know since I was probably 13. His work is magic, so you should definitely find one of the galleries that represents him and buy up all of his work. If your stacks are short, you can also purchase the tote bag he made for us here. Enjoy!

In The Studio Of Sage Vaughn

We caught up with Sage Vaughn in anticipation of the Terri & Gary show, A Depiction of Love and Reality opening at THIS tonight.

[Read more]

Page 1 of 212