Openings & Parties: Larry Clark’s Retrospective at Luhring Augustine

Photos by Christos Katsiaouni

Babes of Yore: Rita Moreno

Rita Moreno is a Puerto Rican actress, singer, and very capable babe who has won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony.

Pathetic Bubble

A look through the 42 page zine by Horfée & Russell Maurice that accompanies their exhibition under the same name at China Heights Gallery in Sydney, Austrlia. More info on purchase here

Installation View: Art Truancy – Celebrating 20 Years of Juxtapoz Magazine

On view at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through June 14th.

The Top 20 States in the USA to Visit This Summer

As determined by us judging contestants in the 2014 Miss USA Pageant. A nation of brunettes.

Openings & Parties: FriendsWithYou ‘Little Cloud’ Release & Book Signing + TWBE HIGH Kite

A perfect evening at the PK Shop.

Photographs by Christos Katsiaouni

25 Grams: Austin McManus

25 Grams is a feature that culls pictures from some of our favorite instagram feeds.

Austin McManus is a New York-based Photographer and the Photography Director at Juxtapoz.

He can be followed on instagram at @theflopboxxx

The Art of Tuning Back In: An Interview with Daniel Arnold

Daniel Arnold tirelessly captures and catalogs the serendipity and the strange goings-on in and around New York City’s streets every day. Roaming the landscape so we don’t have to, Arnold presents these images to the world in a constant live stream of photographs from his brain to your eyes, via his website and popular Instagram account. He works so determinedly and creates so much great work that he’s become somewhat of a New York City fixture himself, not just documenting the fabric of the city, but becoming part of it. So, what happens when he’s dropped into the middle of another city for six short days and tasked with making the same magic happen there too? From the looks of Arnold’s new show, Six Days in San Francisco, now on view at Wolfe Contemporary, the same amazing things. Shot, processed, printed, framed, and hung all in less than a week, the show highlights the similar trappings of oddness, sadness, humor, and beauty that his New York work does, while exposing new ideas about the city and about documenting the unexpected and unknown. I hunted down Daniel for some insights into the whole process.

—Christian

 
 
Christian Storm: How did the whole show in San Francisco come about?

Daniel Arnold: I was in a group show at the Wolfe Contemporary Gallery about a year ago, which was kind of an anomaly for them. They usually show painters but the guy who runs it has an assistant who, because it’s a smaller operation, is more involved than most, and she was following me on Instagram and recommended me for the show. So, some time went by and they had an opening out of nowhere and they offered me a solo show. It was very short notice and I could have taken an easy route, but it happened that I was going be in LA around that time. I went out to San Francisco ten days before the show and I figured I’d make it interesting and try to shoot the whole thing there.
 
That’s crazy. What was that pressure like to shoot a whole show in such a short amount of time? It’s definitely different than the way you work normally, I assume.

It was really hard. I guess I didn’t really understand what high stakes I was setting for myself. I’ve been in a rhythm of producing so much work on a regular basis, basically every day, that I felt fairly confident that I could just show up and make it happen. But the combination of being a stranger in town and sleeping on assorted couches and going three days at a time without being able to change my clothes and just walking all day, every day- I have a pedometer on my phone and by the end, I had walked 100 miles- was tough. It was a huge physical exertion and a bit of a psychological trial too, but it ultimately ended up being so much more rewarding for that. I think my outsider take on such recent times made for a more interesting, engaging show. I’ve always been a big fan of San Francisco but I’ve never had a real proper look around and it was a great way to experience the city.
 
You talk about viewing San Francisco from a fresh viewpoint. When you’re photographing in a city, how much about the work is about the specific city itself, and how much of is it about humans in general?

For the most part, the differences between cities in my photos are pretty subtle. It didn’t feel like a gimmicky change of pace for me, like I was finding people in Giants hats or eating sourdough bread. A lot of the New York stuff, pretty much the whole past few years, has been a product of loneliness and walking around, feeling kind of bummed, tuning out my own life and getting tuned into my surroundings. San Francisco provided plenty of loneliness. That downtrodden feeling wasn’t hard to come by in a place where I was disoriented and walking uphill all day. I found San Francisco to be much wilder and more threatening than New York, and I think that came through in some of it. The spirit there is much closer to surface than in New York, where people are much more calculated and manicured. But for the most part, the experience was very similar. It was just fresher because it was new; I could see things a little more clearly.
 

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Babes of Yore: Dawn Grayson

Dawn Grayson is a former English actress known primarily for pin-ups and a role in the 1969 film, The Nine Ages of Nakedness.

{note: boobs}

Installation View: Matthew Palladino at Garth Greenan Gallery

Matthew Palladino’s immense talent is on full display in this solo exhibition of vibrant relief paintings on view at Garth Greenan Gallery through June 28th, 2014.

WANE-spotting

Anyone who has been on the streets of NYC in the past year would be blind not to have noticed the bold work of WANE COD gracing the sides of box trucks and vans across the five boroughs. Here’s a sampling courtesy of the ISOking

Portraits of Child Laborers

This series of photos by Lewis Hine was key in influencing the changing of US child labor laws in the early 20th century.

25 Grams: Nate Walton

25 Grams is a feature that culls pictures from some of our favorite instagram feeds.

Nate Walton is a Los Angeles-based Photographer.

He can be followed on instagram at @natewalton3

Installation View: Just Before Brazil

This group exhibition of works on paper is on view at ALICE in Brussels, Belgium through June 27th, 2014.

Featuring: Maya Hayuk, Todd James, Steve Powers, Poch, HuskMitNavn, Sozyone Gonzalez, Atelier Pica Pica, Invader, Hell’O Monsters, Parra, Boris Tellegen, Colonel & Spit, Momo, Paul Wackers, Bjarke P z Olsen, Sophie d’Ansembourg, Jaba, HoNeT, Dave Decat, Sixe Paredes, Michael Swaney, 2 shy, Guy Yanai, Samuel François, Escif, Cleon Peterson

The Little Screens

A series from the early 1960s by Lee Friedlander

Flower Arrangements

 
In Joe Garvey’s intriguing new series, he collages sports stars with flower and plants: The background of a Babe Ruth baseball card has been replaced by daisies, and Michael Jordan dribbles amidst an arrangement of tiger lilies. “I’ve always loved plants and mixing them with the basketball images has been really satisfying,” Joe says. “Taking two beautiful things to make a new image is exciting for me.” Joe started collecting old photo books a few years ago, and now uses his extensive files to create these juxtapositions. “I take a few images from the cache that I find interesting and start fussing with them,” he explains, “sometimes it takes me a few minutes, sometimes a few hours, even days to be finally happy with a composition.” Joe will soon publish a zine through Done To Death publications, which features collages of vintage sports memorabilia auction catalogs with images of flowers, plants and nature. In the meantime, you can purchase his recent T-shirt collaboration with Deer Dana here, which features his Snoopy illustration on the front and a portrait of John Baldessari on the back. Baldessari is one of the artists who most inspire Joe’s work, along with Sol LeWitt, Stuart Davis, Clyfford Still, Keith Haring, Chuck Close and Ed Ruscha.
 
Zio

Babes of Yore: Bunny Yeager

Bunny Yeager was a pin-up model who went behind the lens to capture years of iconic images as well as strong self-portrait work. Once proclaimed “World’s Prettiest Photographer” by U.S. Camera Magazine, Yeager passed away May 25th, 2014 at the age of 85 of congestive heart failure.

Deep Below Heaven

The wrinkles in this new publication from Mikael Kennedy are not intentional, I foolishly left the once-pristine 32-page, 9″ x 14″ zine full of beautiful landscapes on my dining room table next to an open window and an empty bottle of red wine. It rained that night, and this is the unfortunate effect of humidity on newsprint. You could say that this zine now has a “well-traveled” look to it, and that would be great, because starting tomorrow night, Mikael and his wife, Folk-Singer Melaena Cadiz begin their month long tour across America. Celebrating the joint release of their respective album + photo collection—both titled “Deep Below Heaven”—the duo’s first stop is at the Westerlind Showroom in Nolita for a performance accompanied by photo-projections. Stop by at 7pm and wish them well on their journey through the heartland.

More information on Deep Blue Heaven here

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The Tattooed Lady Exhibit

Jessica Harrison’s “Painted Ladies” are on view at Galerie LJ in Paris, France through June 24th, 2014.

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