California Girls

 

Art by Carly Jean Andrews.

ArtFits (vol. 29)

 

A look at people and the outfits they wear to art openings in New York City.

Photographs by Christos Katsiaouni (who now has his own website)

Location: “LANDSCAPES” at Marlborough Chelsea (06/23/2016)

Meat Is The Queen, Murder Is Dead

 

The Smiths is a new book of never-before-seen photographs of the influential band at their peak by Nalinee Darmrong with essays from Andy Bell of Erasure and music journalist Marc Spitz. Darmrong traveled with The Smiths during the Meat Is Murder and The Queen Is Dead tours in 1985–1986 capturing on-stage moments as well as more revealing candid shots. Some of the most interesting stuff is the ephemera – backstage passes, set lists, promo materials, clothing and letters. The book serves as a time capsule; chronicling everything about the much-loved Manchester bred voice of the ‘80s.
 
—Chris Black

Amore Tecnologico

 

Andy Rementer’s Online Dating stamps for the Republic of San Marino.

How Lo Can You Go

 

Tom Gould and Thirstin Howl the 3rd join forces for Bury Me With the Lo On, an in-depth exploration into the history of Lo Life culture and Polo collecting.

The Quiet Of Not Listening

 

New works by Geoff McFetridge at V1 Gallery.

Decisive Purchases

 

Magnum is back with another iconic 6×6” square print sale.

Fully Melted: An Interview with Chris Cascio

 

“As a kid growing up in Houston I collected rocks,” says Christopher Cascio. “I also had a stamp collection and a coin collection and baseball cards, but really what I was into were the Mad magazines and Garbage Pail Kids. That was the stuff that led me to being an artist.” What began with obsessive-compulsive word drawings a decade ago grew into a collaged painting practice — one might call it an image hoarder’s bricolage — that incorporated everything from advertisements of amplifiers and actual clearance stickers to Budweiser labels and nightclub wristbands. They owe as much to the Gee’s Bend Quiltmakers as they do to Mike Kelley and Fred Tomaselli. “I’m a huge fan of Fred Tomaselli,” says Cascio. “He literally puts drugs into his paintings.” More recently, the artist’s meditations on branding have led to two new series of camouflaged map paintings that put Warhol, Madison Avenue, Big Pharma and the shelf of the local marijuana dispensary into a blender. The result is a comical color field adventure; higher learning at its finest.

 

What was the impetus behind this body of work?

I did a show in 2014 at Peter Makebish’s gallery in New York where I showed these big colorful maps that had pharmaceutical drug brand names, generic names and pill imprint codes. The maps ended up looking like the drugs they were cataloging. The benzos were shades of light blue and the promethazine/codeine cough syrup had shapes of drippy purples that kind of resembled camouflage. They were a critical view of the pharmaceutical industry and how branding happens at that level. It dealt with a lot of socio-political issues. There was a Soma one, a Vicodin one, but I also did one with weed.
 
Why was that?

I was starting to think about marijuana and how the names of certain strains become that strain’s identity. They’re often given names that pertain to marijuana use, and because marijuana becoming legalized I was also using labels from actual dispensaries. This was 2014, so it’s come a long way in two years. My parents have a place in Winter Park, Colorado and during that time there was a dispensary many miles down the road from Winter Park. Now there are three dispensaries in Winter Park. I don’t do any pharmaceuticals anymore but I still partake in cannabis so it’s something that hits close to home. In my mind, I could always do a series just about that.
 
And that series is what you’re showing at Maitland Foley.

Yeah, the Drug Map (Cannabis) work from that show in New York is the inspiration. It was a six-by-eight-foot painting and it was a pretty popular piece, it was published in Sneeze, an international poster sized magazine, and it struck a chord with people in the way that the pharmaceutical pieces didn’t. It’s more celebratory.
 
Meaning that having brands is a win, of sorts, for the average pot smoker while pharmaceutical brands are an example of Big Pharma winning?

Right. And I’ve used all kinds of weed from street drugs to medical marijuana, I’m an equal opportunity-employer in that sense. But I don’t see marijuana in the same way that I see those [pharmaceutical] drugs. So when I was making that first weed painting I was putting in strains that were my favorite strains, making sure that it has more of a connection to my present than to a darker past.
 
[Read more]

Undercover Cars

 

Clint Woodside extends his in-depth photo series to a 68-page hardcover book published by Kill Your Idols.

Available for purchase now

ArtFits (vol. 27)

 

A look at people and the outfits they wear to art openings in New York City.

Photographs by Christos Katsiaouni

Location:Tom Sachs: Nuggets at Jeffrey Deitch (05/05/2016)

The Literary Artist

 

Work by Dave Eggers

ArtFits (vol. 26)

 

A look at people and the outfits they wear to art openings in New York City.

Photographs by Christos Katsiaouni

Location: Adam Green’s Aladdin at The Hole (04/07/2016)

Page 1 of 18412345...10...Last Page »