The Surrealist’s Cookbook

A look through Salvador Dali’s Les diners de Gala

Year After Year, The World’s Best Calendar

A look through 12 months of models photographed by Steven Meisel for the 2015 Pirelli Calendar

{note: boobs}
 
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Plants, Sports Cards, and Portraits

Jonas Wood’s new exhibition of work at David Kordansky Gallery in LA is MAJOR.

Al Jaffee and the Art of the Fold-In

A new exhibition in Brooklyn looks at a few examples from the more than four hundred pieces of fold-in art created by the MAD Magazine mastermind.

Found Photos (pt. 24)

Unearthed and collected by Dave Schubert while digging through dead people’s stuff at garage sales, estate sales, and flea markets.

Magnum Images Rescued from Oblivion

Magnum’s “Square Print Sale” features overlooked work by photographic masters like Elliot Erwitt, Bruce Davidson, and Thomas Hoepker. The signed, 6″x6″ time-limited editions are available for $100 through Friday, November 14th at 5pm EST, so get your good gifting on until then.

Openings & Parties: Freezer Burn

Last Saturday night on the Upper East Side, Hauser & Wirth presented ‘FREEZER BURN’, a group exhibition put together by Rita Ackermann. Featuring a list of stellar names and artworks, the turnout for opening night was a supreme success. Christos Katsiaouni on hand to document the atmosphere.

FREEZER BURN is on view through December 20th, 2013

DUCKS

By the time that you’ve finished looking through the entirety of this massive group show curated by Ryan Travis Christian, you’ll have more thoughts than you previously had on the quacking creature. Whether those thoughts are good or bad is completely up to you. Just know that there’ll be more.

On view at Greenpoint Terminal Gallery through November 29th, 2014

Openings & Parties: “NOT FOR PROFIT” presented by Vito Schnabel and the Bruce High Quality Foundation

Last night, The Bruce High Quality Foundation went all Willy Wonka by opening the doors to their rarely seen headquarters. The occasion was “NOT FOR PROFIT,” a benefit and celebratory evening of live music and performances by Dev Hynes, Ana Fabrega, FAKE INJURY PARTY, Edan, Blazer Sound System and Max McFerren. Attendees drank from an open Vodka Bar provided by Belvedere Vodka, and bought art right off the walls to help raise funds for the BHQFU.

Photos courtesy of BFA

Covers of Death

Working primarily with an airbrush in the 1940s, Gerald Gregg designed close to 200 covers for Dell paperbacks at the Western Printing & Lithographing Company in Racine, Wisconsin. Some of his best work comes from the ‘Mystery’ imprint, featured in the gallery above.

New Trees

Robert Voit’s large format series humorously highlights the odd, oversized attempts to hide cell phone towers in plain sight. The series is on view at Clamp Art through November 15th, 2014.

Untitled (I skate therefore I am)

California Concepts by Adam Villacin

Buy a copy here

The Prestige of Terror

Broomberg & Chanarin pay homage to George Henein and the Egyptian Surrealist Movement. The title “The Prestige of Terror” comes from the name of a pamphlet that Henein created shortly after the dropping of the atomic bomb.

25 Grams: Crystal Renn

25 Grams is a feature that culls pictures from some of our favorite instagram feeds.

Crystal Renn is a New York-based model, author, and photographer.

She can be followed on instagram at @crystalball1111

Logos, Trademarks, and Mascots

For his latest exhibition Likelihood of Confusion, former intellectual property lawyer and full-time artist Alfred Steiner subverts pervasive logos using meticulously drawn objects and the Freudian method of free association.

On view at Joshua Liner Gallery through November 15th, 2014.

How Art Can Save The Universe From Total Destruction

An evangelical booklet for the promotion of the humanities by Mark Mulroney. Available by mail-order here

For those in SF, Mark has a new show opening at Ever Gold this Saturday, October 18th, from 7-10pm

The Wrath of the Laugh: An Interview with Wayne White

By the time you read this, Wayne White’s Invisible Ruler will be closed. The exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery was Wayne’s return to NYC, and an outstanding success. Earlier this week, we caught up with Wayne in Los Angeles and proceeded to talk about life, art, and his life in art.

 
TWBE: Let’s start from the beginning. You grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when did you first discover art?

Wayne White: That’s a tough question. I guess I discovered art in drawing, and that’s one of my earliest memories. I discovered drawing just on my own as every kid does. I didn’t know it was called art and I didn’t really know what an artist was for a long time. There were no galleries or museums or any culture around when I was kid at that time. I came to it naturally from just a love of drawing and of course as I grew I learned about art history and artists and everything. My mother was where I got my biggest influence from. She was the artistic one in the family and loved to decorate, collect antiques and stuff. So she knew a little bit about art. When I was a little bitty kid I remember her saying, “Well Wayne could be a commercial artist one day.” She’d say that to adults, I overheard her because she didn’t say it directly to me. I would sit there as a little kid and I would imagine an artist that comes on between TV shows on the commercial and he’s standing there painting a portrait and it’s a commercial you know… (Laughter). And you get a smock – I remember it as clear as a bell. The vision I had in my head. You’ve got a smock on and there’s a pedestal with a bowl of fruit on it and an easel. It’s a commercial of a guy painting. I thought that’s what a commercial artist was.
 
So from there you went to art school and studied abstract painting at a college in Tennessee?

Yeah as I grew in Chattanooga, I went to high school and stuff and I was the school artist and a cartoonist on the school newspapers. That’s what I originally wanted to be as a kid was a cartoonist because that was my idea of an artist. And then I went to Middle Tennessee State University and I majored in painting because I just thought that painting was a serious thing to do. It’s what real artist did. I took four years of painting and art history and stuff, and that’s where I really learned about the art world and the history of art. The history part of it was just as important as the actual doing of it because that was a great education for me. Just learning about the past. I studied abstract – my painting teacher was an abstract expressionist. That was my first serious foray into painting, abstract painting.
 
You never strayed from that at all? You never tried to paint cartoons or anything?

Well, I kept drawing underground cartoons for the college newspaper and I always had an interest in cartoons. And my abstract paintings had a very cartoony line and I was interested in finding the gap between abstract paintings and cartoons which they share a lot, and I was a big fan of Phillip Guston and Willem de Kooning who both had very cartoony lines. Cartoons were never very far from my mind and then the minute that I graduated from four years of that abstract expressionism and everything, I got back into comics because I saw Raw Magazine and I knew this was the next generation for undergrounds. It was full of exciting great art and Raw Magazine is what got me convinced to become a cartoonist again. It inspired me to move to New York City.
 
What year was that?

It was 1980 when I first saw Raw. I was in Nashville where I lived for a year after I graduated.
 
When did you move to New York?

I didn’t get to New York until January of ’82. I spent another year in Nashville saving my dough (laughs) and then I made the leap. And in 1982 it was pretty rough and ready you know. I lived downtown in the East Village and it was still pretty funky, but it was a great time for the arts. A time when a young artist could afford to live in Manhattan and it was New York City so it was great. It was very exciting. It was my best education.
 

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Openings & Parties: Lance De Los Reyes – Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

This past Friday night, The Hole debuted the first solo exhibition by NY-based artist Lance De Los Reyes. Christos Katsiaouni was on hand to document the scene.

Crystal Girls

A series of work by Noé Sendas

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