Picture of the Day

dave-potes

David Potes

Ode To A Flower

Adapted from an interview with theoretical physicist Richard Feynman, and animated by Fraser Davidson

via, curiousbrain

No Watering Necessary

Saint-Brieuc-Paul-Wackers-Print

Paul Wackers recently worked with Editions Anaïck Moriceau on three new prints including this 12-color piece of plant life, Saint-Brieuc. On the very affordable side, each print is available in an edition of 20.

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Space Blossoms

space-cherry-trees

In 2008, Japanese astronauts took cherry tree seeds with them to the International Space Station. After 8 months and 4,100 times around the globe, the seeds came home and were planted in various locations around Japan. Four years later, some of the “space cherry trees” are now blossoming with just five petals—compared with around 30—a full six years ahead of schedule. Hypothesizing about the radical growth, one researcher said “there is the possibility that exposure to stronger cosmic rays accelerated the process of sprouting and overall growth.”

Pyramid Terrarium

pyramid-terrarium

A master of angles, Matt W. Moore has created this beautiful pyramid for plants out of White Oak, Mahogany, and Black Walnut. A striking addition to any space, the Pyramid Terrarium is available through his home goods / furniture brand Core Deco

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Pictures of Palm Trees

Palmes pour memoire is a 1991 book compiled by Pierre Marc Richard featuring photographs that include palm trees—from the mid-1800s until the time of publish.

The Plants Have Eyes

We’re particularly fond of Emilia Olsen’s paintings of plants, which feature soft colors and thick layers of oil. “I’m really inspired by layering,” Emilia told The World’s Best Ever, “thick paint application, patterns, repetition—actions that evoke tedium. I’ll start a painting by using a blank canvas as a palette for another work, and build on top of the palette canvas until I feel ready to begin the actual painting.” The South Africa-born New York-based artist is also inspired by peers like Jonas Wood, Yayoi Kusama, Allison Schulnik, Daniel Heidkamp, Ellen Altfest, Wes Lang and Mat Brinkman.

Emilia started painting plants as an escape from her previous work, and as part of her obsession with gardening and houseplants. “I paint from life, photos, and from my imagination,” she says. “It’s not necessary for my plants to be fully representative of the real thing, but succulents can be so strange that it’s nice to get ideas from them. It’s also important to me that the painting plants keep a sense of reality, in terms of how they grow, how leaves reach towards light, or hang. It gives the more unrealistic parts of my paintings something to grip on to.”

The “unrealistic parts” include the addition of eyes, which keep in line with her previous, more whimsical work. “I like thinking of plants as having their own personalities and I like the idea of them bearing silent witness to our lives,” Emilia says. “The eyes are playful, shifty, judgmental, creepy, and perhaps even anxiety-inducing. They remind me of the kind of silly things I would worry about as a child—that my toys would feel neglected if I didn’t play with them enough, or that they were judging my embarrassing moments.”

Zio / @zioxla

Rainmaker

rainmaker-watering-cloud

A screwtop watering cloud

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Would’ve Been a Nice Place to Hang Out

bloomingdales-greenhouse

The greenhouse on the roof of Bloomingdale’s.

Plant Pods

plant-pods

Great looking wall-mounted planters for succulents and cacti

The Beauty of Mangrove Forests

Kudzu Project

For her Kudzu Project, Helene Schmitz traveled through Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina to observe and photograph the nightmarish transformation of the landscape caused by the intrusive plant known as Kudzu.

— Zio / @zioxla

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