The Legend Continues

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The ESS x Bomit “Kilroy Was Here” blank sticker pack

“Art Buff”

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A new piece by Banksy cheekily* highlights the art of graffiti removal.

*we only use this word to describe things of British origin

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The Story Behind SEEN and the Hollywood Sign

The year was 1985, and it took SEEN 12 hours and 50 cans of spraypaint to put his name on the iconic landmark.

via, HYB

Picture of the Day

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Dave Schubert

TWIST ESPO SOPE, 1995

Krink Ventures into Mean Streak Territory

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Introducing the K-80, a Permanent Marking Stick that’s fun to use until it reaches a frozen surface.

Adventure Tip: twist two colors completely out of their cases, cut each in half lengthwise, then match opposites and twist back in.

The Writing On The Wall

london-graffiti

Out of print since 1976, Roger Perry’s The Writing On The Wall has been called “the original book of London graffiti.” Featuring more street sayings than street sprayings, it’s a fine look at 1970’s London counterculture.

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Viva El Barto

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The “Spray it, don’t say it” pin

Getting Up in the Food World

Chef Edward Lee finds similarities between catching a tag and cooking a signature dish.

Go Get’Em Boys

Roberto-Cavalli-lawsuit-REVOK-REYES-STEEL

REVOK, REYES and STEEL are suing Roberto Cavalli for ganking their artwork, using it for his own profit on pieces for his Just Cavalli fashion line, and then ironically going over them with his own wack tag. All the proof is in this exclusive document we’ve received, which you can view after the jump.

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Is This The Most Famous Mural in New York City?

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Probably. Here’s a nice history of Keith Haring’s ‘Crack Is Wack’ piece on a handball court next to the Harlem River Drive.

Fun fact: The park where it’s located is officially named the “Crack Is Wack Playground.”

Blade: King of Graffiti

In all probability, BLADE has painted more subway cars than you have ever ridden on. By 1980, after reaching 5000 or so, the graffiti pioneer stopped counting. In this new 256-page book edited by Roger Gastman, BLADE sits down with Chris ‘FREEDOM’ Pape to reflect on a life of getaways, girls, and the golden years of graffiti. His story is one for the ages, and a must read for those fascinated with the “old” New York.

On a related note for those in NYC: This Friday (8/8) BLADE and Chris Pape will be at the Museum of the City of New York for a presentation and book signing in relation to their new book. More info on that here

Picture of the Day

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Cornbread

On the Street with San Francisco’s Broom & Brush Brigade

Attempting to keep the city clean of graffiti in 2010.

Printables

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Inside the Crumbling 5 Pointz by Tessa Stuart

The Queens Graffiti Mecca 5 Pointz Was Never Just About the Painting on the Outside

Printables

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Live from the Graffiti Underground by Jamie Maleszka

Decades before street artists like Banksy could ignite an Internet firestorm and fetch millions, three guys with a video camera and a stack of VHS tapes set out to share the gritty story of NYC graffiti.

Funk Pucker

A look through Mike Giant‘s 2002 collaborative zine with Dalek

Way to Go, Australia

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Seems some grown-up people are getting pretty pissed off at Wicked Campervans backside slogans.

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Journeying Through NYC’s Subterranean Maze

 

Beneath The Streets: The Hidden Relics of New York’s Subway System is a new book out by JURNE and Matt Litwack that explores New York’s underground through the artistic lens of a graffiti writer. We caught a couple moments of the co-authors time to find out more about the book and life below the city that never sleeps.
 
 
How did the idea for Beneath the Streets come about?

Matt Litwack: During my high school days, I would explore the NYC subway tunnels. I became fascinated with the graffiti, the history, and the general danger of the underground. JURNE and I wanted to create a book that was able to examine the subway system from a sociological, historical, and artistic perspective. We wanted people to be able to see what it’s like for graffiti artists to explore these environments.

Jurne: We’ve been drawn to these hidden or tucked-away city environments for nearly 2 decades, exploring and painting them. The New York City subway tunnel system is one of the most expansive and oldest public transportation systems in the world. With that comes a lot of history, and a lot of potential stories to tell about experiences inside the subway tunnels. There’s a tradition of folklore or story telling that goes hand in hand with graffiti writing. Capturing this story of the New York city subway tunnels, exploration, and graffiti writing inside them was something that Matt and I talked about doing for a long time.
 
Can you describe your first journey underground into the subway tunnels?

Jurne: I remember stepping off the platform into the dark tunnel, and feeling like I was crossing a threshold into a dangerous place, with dim red light illuminating the 3rd rail, and the slow hiss of air coming from pipes over head. It was pretty terrifying. I was immediately fascinated.

Matt Litwack: The first time I ventured underground was with a much older, established and experienced individual. I was fortunate to have someone with such knowledge show me the ropes. Regardless, I was still terrified and didn’t know what to expect or what I might encounter.

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The World’s Earliest Examples of Penis Graffiti

oldest-dick-graffiti

Dating back to the 5th century BC, these large dick drawings are carved into limestone outcroppings on the Aegean island of Astypalaia.

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