The First Rule of Skateboarding is That There Are No Rules

I was a Skate Rat

“a brief meditation on the nature of how suburban nomadic skateboarders find each other, build communities – and as is often the case in adversarial environments – use every inch of their limitations and blank canvas, to breed ideas that influence the life of skateboarders every day. From the kick flip, to the kick tail, Floridians are responsible for scores of technical and cultural advancements – and they are all skate rats.”

Portrait of a Drone

Richard Mosse (of infrared photography fame) directed this short “Death Is Elsewhere” on the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Featuring the X-47B drone in maneuvers on the aircraft carrier, it’s an up close look at the beautiful design of one of the pilotless killers.

Flying Lotus – Never Catch Me (feat. Kendrick Lamar)

Not sure when music videos started getting called films, but this one is by Hiro Murai.

Yung Mule

“La Carnada” is a short film about a 13-year old’s first trip across the border smuggling cocaine.

Trailer Party


 
All of the movies worth watching in theaters this weekend
 
Advanced Style

A documentary examining the lives of seven unique New Yorkers whose eclectic personal style and vital spirit have guided their approach to aging. Based on Ari Seth Cohen’s famed blog of the same name, this film paints intimate and colorful portraits of independent, stylish women aged 62 to 95 who are challenging conventional ideas about beauty, aging, and Western’s culture’s increasing obsession with youth.
 
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Picture Takers and Zine Makers


 
Tobin Yelland profiles Ray Potes, Lele Saveri, Clint Woodside, and Teenwitch in this short documentary series for Vans.
 
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Trailer Party


 
All of the movies worth watching in theaters this weekend
 
Tusk

Kevin Smith returns to film with this “transformational tale” where a man is involuntarily changed into a Walrus.
 

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Morning Dose of RUSH HOUR

Directed by Fernando Livschitz

JOYRIDE.

William Strobeck’s new video.

Your Mother Wears Nike.

Is this video art? Is this advertising? Is this a music video film? These are the questions that went through my head as I watched this entire video by Dr. Romanelli, featuring highlights from British Knights advertising history. Accompanied by a soundtrack created by Alchemist, Samiyam and Action Bronson, British Knights: Which Ways The Beach Mix, as it’s officially known is a hypnotic journey through a world of bygone creativity… and it’s really fucking good.

via, egotrip

Recreating The Ghostbusters Proton Streams Through Light Painting

The More You Know

Introducing Mr. Tusk and White Walrus

white-walrus-mr-tusk
 
Partnering with A24 Films, we are celebrating the release of Kevin Smith’s new film TUSK in a very nontraditional way. Keying in on the director’s admission that the film “was born in a blaze,” TWBE has created packaging inspired by the film for two rebranded strains of medicinal marijuana. Named ‘Mr. Tusk’ and ‘White Walrus’, and available through September 26th, these strains of pot have been grown by Kushman Veganics as “Veganic Chernobyl (GT)” and “Kens OG” for Buds & Roses, one of Los Angeles’s oldest and most respected dispensaries. Accompanying this in-store promotion, limited edition herb grinders bearing the Tusk logo will be given away to patients of the dispensary and fans of the film (18+ years of age). And what would all of this be without a user-generated contest? Starting September 10th and running until the release of Tusk on September 19th, we’ll be asking fans to submit to instagram their best pictures of #WalrusBreath, which is most easily described as “the act of creating tusks by blowing smoke or vapor out of one’s nostrils.”
 
For more information on this project, click here
 
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Openings & Parties: Promiscuities

This past Wednesday we co-hosted a party at Le Baron with Selectism for Jonathan Leder’s new film Promiscuities, starring Amy Hood. As one would expect with a sexy film, the crowd that gathered at the downtown club was nothing short of stunning.

Photos by Christos Katsiaouni

Got That Water, Man

AI WEIWEI (艾未未) stars in THE SAND STORM (沙尘暴), a “low-fi sci-fi” short set in the future in a dusty-ass China.

Analyzing Promiscuity: An Interview With Jonathan Leder

leder-interview

Jonathan Leder’s new film Promiscuities is a sexy psychological thriller starring the gorgeous Amy Hood as a lost young woman seduced into exploring her personal issues through various sexual relationships. It’s a visual tour de force that takes erotic filmmaking to a new level, and is best viewed under the cover of darkness. Here, we talk with Jonathan about the film and his collaborative relationship with the leading actress and co-writer.

What is Promiscuities about?

Promiscuities is the story of a young woman (Diane) who was violently abused by her mother during childhood, and then seeks the help of a psychotherapist later in life, only to realize that he has a twisted agenda of his own. Diane’s problems primarily manifest themselves through her sexual psychosis, however, she has other very apparent psychological issues as well, her dependency on pills, alcohol, delusions, anger, fear, extreme self consciousness, a desperate need for love and affection, and dangerous self destructive tendencies. All of which are propelled and encouraged by her sadistic doctor.

The screenplay is an original story written by Amy Hood and myself. We began outlining the idea of Promiscuities back in January of this year, shortly after we published Fetishisms Volume 1. We began to think about a way to bring some of the psychological concepts we had been exploring to life in the context of a narrative film people could enjoy. We choose this subject matter because it allowed us to explore a lot of concepts that we were interested in. Psychological concepts, that affect many, if not all of us, in some way or another. The film is based on some true stories, some fiction, some personal influences.

How did you two meet and what was the working process like?

Amy and I have been working together now for nearly two years. Of course we met in the classic sort of model / photographer way. Working on this project was very in depth, but also very informal. A lot of research went into the project and we both came up with ideas that we pushed each other on. The overhead cost for producing this film was really very low, so we were able to spend a lot of time filming. We spent on and off nearly six months working on the project. If we didn’t like something, or the way something came out, we either scrapped it, or re did it. I think the process was very sculptural and tactile. We tried a lot of things, sometimes they were brilliant, other times (though not as often!) they were failures. The best part is being able to take risks, and having people around you that are able to support you when you take those risks.

This is such a sexually charged film…

Diane’s whole premise “I guess it’s safe to say I have a problem with sex” is sort of the jumping off point for exploration in this film. The idea of exploring aspects of human nature that other people are afraid to discuss in an intelligent and mature way is always interesting to me. Human beings are fascinating creatures, and I suppose I agree with Freud that human sexuality is often at the root of a large part of human psychology.

“I guess we always long for forbidden things” or “I knew I was alive with the heat of her hand around my cock.” Sure, it’s sexual, but these are universal truths that speak to all of us.

What were some of the biggest challenges you faced during the filming? How did you keep the talent comfortable during some of the more graphic scenes?

Filming went relatively well. Many of the scenes were improvised and the actors, especially Phillip Levine did a fantastic job with the improv. The whole scene when he is walking down the staircase at night is complete improv. Just right off the cuff. No script at all. Those scenes turned out so vibrantly, but I guess it was a risk. They could have been awful with other actors.

Some of the sexual scenes were a bit awkward to film, sometimes I had to push Amy to do things she wasn’t entirely comfortable to do, which I did not always enjoy. There are others that did not make it into the film because the ‘chemistry’ wasn’t there, but as long as you can go back and get it right, it’s no big deal. I guess after a while Amy got a bit burnt out making out with everyone.

Any tips for aspiring filmmakers?

Make your own rules. Study the great films. Ignore the formulaic crap coming out of Hollywood today completely. Take more risks. Take your time. Throw away your cell phone so you can concentrate. We made this film for under $3,000, but I also spent 350 hours editing it. Time is more important than money, in my opinion.

Promiscuities is available for digital download and streaming here (18+)

Another Addition to The Seemingly Endless Fodder of Wes Anderson Films

Vehicles.

Great Music Choice

Every single death in a Tarantino movie accompanied by The Delfonic’s “Didn’t I (Blow your mind this time)”

8-Bit Twin Peaks

Would play this as an RPG game on Nintendo.

via, WelcomeToTwinPeaks

“a dystopian vision of the future as imagined by a child in the 80s”

Daniel Wolfe’s striking short film for Scottish musician Paolo Nutini’s new single ‘Iron Sky’

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