Beware the Red-Eyed Tiger

matt-leines-tiger-head-patch

Matt Leines just made this really cool six color embroidered Tiger Head patch. It can be yours for the low price of $6.00

Brain Lapse

Jake Fried returns with another hand-drawn experimental animation using ink, white-out, coffee and collage.

The Wrath of the Laugh: An Interview with Wayne White

By the time you read this, Wayne White’s Invisible Ruler will be closed. The exhibition at Joshua Liner Gallery was Wayne’s return to NYC, and an outstanding success. Earlier this week, we caught up with Wayne in Los Angeles and proceeded to talk about life, art, and his life in art.

 
TWBE: Let’s start from the beginning. You grew up in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when did you first discover art?

Wayne White: That’s a tough question. I guess I discovered art in drawing, and that’s one of my earliest memories. I discovered drawing just on my own as every kid does. I didn’t know it was called art and I didn’t really know what an artist was for a long time. There were no galleries or museums or any culture around when I was kid at that time. I came to it naturally from just a love of drawing and of course as I grew I learned about art history and artists and everything. My mother was where I got my biggest influence from. She was the artistic one in the family and loved to decorate, collect antiques and stuff. So she knew a little bit about art. When I was a little bitty kid I remember her saying, “Well Wayne could be a commercial artist one day.” She’d say that to adults, I overheard her because she didn’t say it directly to me. I would sit there as a little kid and I would imagine an artist that comes on between TV shows on the commercial and he’s standing there painting a portrait and it’s a commercial you know… (Laughter). And you get a smock – I remember it as clear as a bell. The vision I had in my head. You’ve got a smock on and there’s a pedestal with a bowl of fruit on it and an easel. It’s a commercial of a guy painting. I thought that’s what a commercial artist was.
 
So from there you went to art school and studied abstract painting at a college in Tennessee?

Yeah as I grew in Chattanooga, I went to high school and stuff and I was the school artist and a cartoonist on the school newspapers. That’s what I originally wanted to be as a kid was a cartoonist because that was my idea of an artist. And then I went to Middle Tennessee State University and I majored in painting because I just thought that painting was a serious thing to do. It’s what real artist did. I took four years of painting and art history and stuff, and that’s where I really learned about the art world and the history of art. The history part of it was just as important as the actual doing of it because that was a great education for me. Just learning about the past. I studied abstract – my painting teacher was an abstract expressionist. That was my first serious foray into painting, abstract painting.
 
You never strayed from that at all? You never tried to paint cartoons or anything?

Well, I kept drawing underground cartoons for the college newspaper and I always had an interest in cartoons. And my abstract paintings had a very cartoony line and I was interested in finding the gap between abstract paintings and cartoons which they share a lot, and I was a big fan of Phillip Guston and Willem de Kooning who both had very cartoony lines. Cartoons were never very far from my mind and then the minute that I graduated from four years of that abstract expressionism and everything, I got back into comics because I saw Raw Magazine and I knew this was the next generation for undergrounds. It was full of exciting great art and Raw Magazine is what got me convinced to become a cartoonist again. It inspired me to move to New York City.
 
What year was that?

It was 1980 when I first saw Raw. I was in Nashville where I lived for a year after I graduated.
 
When did you move to New York?

I didn’t get to New York until January of ’82. I spent another year in Nashville saving my dough (laughs) and then I made the leap. And in 1982 it was pretty rough and ready you know. I lived downtown in the East Village and it was still pretty funky, but it was a great time for the arts. A time when a young artist could afford to live in Manhattan and it was New York City so it was great. It was very exciting. It was my best education.
 

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Keeping Busy Creating

“Cody Hudson & The Art of the Side Hustle” a 2-part documentary by Jared Eberhard for Vans.

Cody Hudson has a day job as a graphic designer and is also a creative collaborator with several independent brands. He discusses a need to create art even if no one sees it. Cody tours his studio and the city of Chicago, highlighting examples of his favorite work.

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The Line

Saul Steinberg’s 404-inch drawing from 1954 comes to life in this video trailer for a new Nieves publication

420 Pages of Funny Drawings by Jay Howell

punks-git-cut-zines

You’ve probably watched at least 420 minutes of his drawings on television, so repeatedly flipping through all of the pages in Jay Howell’s new art book should be an enjoyable breeze for you. Titled “Punks Git Cut: A Zine Anthology by Jay Howell” it’s just one of the many rad new publications that Last Gasp is kickstarting for their fall new season of books. Pre-order today and impress your friends tomorrow

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Openings & Parties: Lance De Los Reyes – Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

This past Friday night, The Hole debuted the first solo exhibition by NY-based artist Lance De Los Reyes. Christos Katsiaouni was on hand to document the scene.

Nu Liife

nu-liife-56

A special Monday version of our weekly comic by Andrew Jeffrey Wright / @ajw4ever

CHIT CHAT ROULETTE

Directed & animated by David Lüpschen

Art Tonight (and this weekend) in New York

mangan

Peter Sutherland and Jim Mangan at Muddguts, Lance De Los Reyes at The Hole, and Chuck Webster drawing at the Wythe Hotel. All the info below.

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16-Bits of Surrealism

The Persistence of Pixels, an homage to Dalí

Crystal Girls

A series of work by Noé Sendas

Printables

Levon-Mosgofian

Was Levon Mosgofian of Tea Lautrec Litho the Most Psychedelic Printer in Rock? by Ben Marks

If it weren’t for the career pressmen at companies such as Bindweed Press, Cal Litho, West Coast Litho, and Tea Lautrec Litho, the drug-fueled dreams of Wes Wilson, Alton Kelley, Stanley Mouse, Victor Moscoso, and Rick Griffin might never have seen the light of day.

The Irony of it All

banksy-immigration

A new street piece by Banksy poking fun at the anti-immigration U.K. Independence Party was buffed from its location in Clacton-on-Sea yesterday after many in the town complained that it was racist.

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In The World of Expensive Prints That Will Sell Out in a Minute or Two

kaws-presenting-the-past-print

“KAWS PRESENTING THE PAST” available for $3,400 on Thursday October 2nd at noon EST on http://www.kawsone.com

Screenprint on Saunders Waterford 425gm HP Hi White
32 x 32 inches/81.3 x 81.3 cm
Edition of 250, 50 APs
Signed and dated 2014

 

Ed’s Nudes

Ed Templeton recently unveiled a new website cataloguing his art career, so we took it upon ourselves to highlight some of the nudes that he’s done over the years.

Perfect Stranger

eddie-martinez-perfect-stranger-print

While you definitely don’t get the depth of his work on a flat sheet of paper, this new print by Eddie Martinez is still great looking, and in a low edition. Available through Exhibition A.

Monochromatic Skate Decks

Goodhood currently has an exhibition/benefit/silent auction on display in their London shop titled “The Art of Skateboarding.” Featuring one-off decks by artists including James Jarvis, Jake & Dinos Chapman, and Jiro Bevis, all proceeds from the auction will go to the Long Live Southbank Charity.

More info here

“Art Buff”

art-buff-banksy

A new piece by Banksy cheekily* highlights the art of graffiti removal.

*we only use this word to describe things of British origin

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