Ai Weiwei: According to What?

This introduction to the work of Ai Weiwei was published in conjunction with his wonderful US retrospective, which luckily enough opens at the Brooklyn Museum this Friday, April 18th.

Printables

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Ryan McGinley: Naked and Famous by Alice Gregory

In the beginning, Ryan McGinley was an outsider. He used his band of beautiful friends to create photographs—rarely not naked but never quite sexy—that he now calls “evidence of fun.” But in the past decade, McGinley’s vision has evolved and expanded into a tidal wave of influence, affecting the look of art, advertising, music videos, film, even Instagram—and making him arguably the most important photographer in America. So why are so many of us just learning his name?

Morning Dose of Skin Illustrations

A Supercut of Tattoos in Film

Pettibon’s Surfers

Details from Are Your Motives Pure? at Venus Over Manhattan

Breaking Down the Quiet Ponds, Wilderness Cabins, and Happy Little Clouds

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FiveThirtyEight does A Statistical Analysis of the Work of Bob Ross

Flash Us: Pemex

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For our series, “Flash Us,” we ask some of our favorite tattoo artists to create a design based on a classic theme—naked ladies. This week, Pemex sent us the above. Pemex tattoos out of Castro Tattoo in San Francisco, and you can follow him here.

 

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Heads or Tails

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In such a disposable economy, it’s always a treasure to come across old money. Here, Chris Ware imagines the journey of one penny, minted in 1929.

The Most Mainstream Vandal On Earth

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Gotta love a new Banksy or two.

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Acid

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A very cool new surfing publication from Europe that aims to inspire and inform your time out of the water.

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The World’s First Drone Paintings

KATSU has always been at the forefront of pushing the limits of graffiti, and his latest project finally removes him physically from the act of painting, leaving the dirty work to the robots. By building out the hardware and developing the technology to allow a civilian drone to carry spray paint and in turn spray while flying, KATSU has made a graffiti drone. With the ability to get to spots previously inaccessible, the remote control vandal has opened up a new landscape for mark making. Now, not to be confined to limits of outdoor space, KATSU has—in true graffiti fashion—taken his new media tools of defacement indoors and created these 10 works now on display inside The Hole’s booth at the Silicon Valley Contemporary Art Fair.

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Art Tonight (and this Weekend) in New York & Beyond

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Without further ado…

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Old World Pain

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“The Dark Rider” is a new print by Cleon Peterson

When Smoking Was Still Mainstream Cool

Keith Haring x Lucky Strike

Picture Planes: An Interview with Charlie Rubin

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When you look at Charlie Rubin’s new book, Strange Paradise, you realize that the title is really perfect. While the images are striking and lush, full of interesting and beautiful visual flora and fauna, they have a sense of weirdness and unease. It’s the kind of imagery that requires time and pondering to notice all the nuances and cleverness going on behind the scenes. Charlie creates photographs and then takes them back to his studio, altering them in sometimes conspicuous, sometime subtle ways, giving the images an exciting and confounding physicality and confusing our assumptions about what a photograph is. The launching of Strange Paradise, which is out now on Conveyor Editions, will be celebrated tomorrow (4/10) at Printed Matter (complete with a custom window display by Charlie), and everyone should come.
 
Christian: Do you see yourself as a pure photographer in the classic sense, or something else? Your work, while very rooted in photography as a base, has obvious elements and layers of sculpture and painting.
 
Charlie Rubin: I guess I always start with a classic photograph and then build off of it if it feels right, so it’s a mixture of pure and something else. Recently though, I’ve been leaning toward the something else. Even though my work uses painting, collage and sculpture, I still see the final image as a photograph. I also include straight, unaltered, photographs in series and have side documentary or portrait projects. The medium is transforming fast, and it’s made me transform as an artist- a reaction to the utilitarian nature of it and how anyone can take a beautiful photograph these days. It happened naturally for me; I got bored with a lot of my own imagery because I didn’t find anything unique about it anymore, so I needed to find out how to bring meaning back in to my images.

My little sister showed me this app on her phone the other day where you can add light leaks and dust particles to your iPhone photos and I’m like, “Whoa, someone is turning in their grave.” My work is a reaction to these things, to the yearning for physicality, for something real and non-screen.
  
Tell me about how you came upon your process of moving the digital back into a physical realm. Did you have an “A Ha!” moment when you discovered a way to make something new with your photographs?
 
Like I said, it was a response to the feeling that my pictures were losing meaning. I could take the most awesome picture of a sunset with five rainbows and plants and beautiful people in front of it, but it just didn’t matter because I could open up my laptop and find five images just like it. I had to work with the medium and figure out how to convey my frustration and conceptualize this change in the visual cultural landscape surrounding me. It’s also a fantasy or escape from the monotony of imagery I was seeing and making.
 
At first I experimented with ink on my photos, influenced by graffiti and other mark-making techniques, and highlighting what I found important in the photo. I made a breakthrough some years later when I used inkjet ink on an inkjet print and everything came together.

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When You Read An Interview And You Imagine That The Guy Asking The Questions Sounds Like Johnny Utah

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Keanu Reeves talks to Robert Longo. “Fuck yeah.”

The Man Behind The Mountain

Before American Folk Artist Leonard Knight passed away earlier this year, filmmakers Ben Stoddard and Dave Ehrenreich spent some quality time with the creator of Salvation Mountain.

BEPAD

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Opening tonight and maintaining hours through the weekend, BEPAD is a suite event at The Lowell Hotel featuring rare books, photographs, artist interventions, and cultural artifacts from the likes of Fulton Ryder, Harper’s Books and Karma.

Hours:

Wednesday, April 9: 5:00 – 10:00pm
Thursday, April 10: 12:00 – 8:00pm
Friday, April 11: 12:00 – 8:00pm
Saturday, April 12: 12:00 – 8:00pm

Location:

The Lowell Hotel
28 East 63rd Street
New York, NY 10065

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Thierry Noir: Painting Walls

French street artist Thierry Noir was one of the first artists to paint the Berlin Wall, way back in 1984. In this video, he reflects on how street art changed his life.

 

Flash Us: Slawomir Nitschke

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For our series, “Flash Us,” we ask some of our favorite tattoo artists to create a design based on a classic theme—naked ladies. This week, Slawomir Nitschke sent us the above. Slawomir tattoos out Czaszka i Sztylet in Poland, and you can follow him here.

Zio / @zioxla

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