TRAP and the True Art of Graffiti

Cutting Through The Paper Chase

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KRINK’s Drop-Forged Scissors

A Savage Satirist

The art of Ralph Steadman

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Openings & Parties: Larry Clark’s Retrospective at Luhring Augustine

Photos by Christos Katsiaouni

Lawrence Weiner: The means to answer questions

The Street Art Project by the Google Cultural Institute

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If I was 10, I’d probably be stoked on this. However, as a jaded adult I find the whole experience very underwhelming, difficult to navigate, and lacking a discerning eye. As with a lot of destinations on the internet, the people being paid to feed the information rarely have the knowledge and understanding to truly bring a spectacular product to the public. But hey, it’s an “ongoing” project, so it’ll either get better, or very, very worse. With that in mind, enjoy yourself

Art This Week in New York

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Eventually we’ll broaden this to LA, and then the world. But for now, standout shows in New York City.
 
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Skat-At

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Here’s an AT-AT constructed from old skateboard decks by Derek Keenan. The piece was made for the exhibit “Deathstar Blues” at Blackbook Gallery in Denver.

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Pathetic Bubble

A look through the 42 page zine by Horfée & Russell Maurice that accompanies their exhibition under the same name at China Heights Gallery in Sydney, Austrlia. More info on purchase here

Installation View: Art Truancy – Celebrating 20 Years of Juxtapoz Magazine

On view at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through June 14th.

Eddie Martinez Whistles While He Works

Flash Us: Uptown Danny

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For our series, “Flash Us,” we ask some of our favorite tattoo artists to create a design based on a classic theme—naked ladies. This week, Uptown Danny sent us the above. Danny is learning and working at Alte Liebe Tätowierungen in Hamburg, Germany, and you can follow him here.

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Printables

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The Drunken Downfall of Evangelical America’s Favorite Painter by Zac Bissonnette

Thomas Kinkade’s death shocked his legions of fans—not only had the Painter of Light died at 54, but the cause was alcohol and Valium. How did the evangelical darling fall so far?

Bill Watterson Returns to Comics as a Second-Grader

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Under an agreement of anonymity until the comics had been published, Calvin and Hobbes Creator and comic “Bigfoot” Bill Watterson collaborated on three strips of Stephan Pastis’ Pearls Before Swine, drawing as a second-grader named Libby. Above, the first of the three strips.

Signs of Mischief

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Roger Gastman is a great collector of things. Weird classifieds, rare graffiti propaganda, children’s toys, vintage spraypaint, art by serial killers… he’s got it all and more. For TOOLS OF CRIMINAL MISCHIEF, his most recent show which opens tonight at The Seventh Letter Flagship Store and Gallery in LA, Roger has placed on display a robust selection of these artifacts for viewing and consumption. Since his instagram is about the only way we can observe Roger’s daily collectings, we pulled images of some of our favorite digital ephemera, and asked Roger to explain. What follows is the result of our online conversation also known as “explain this picture.”

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FOREVER TOGETHER

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Recently over the course of 3 1/2 days, Steve Powers and ICY Signs painted an entire block of 37 abandoned rowhomes in Baltimore. Forever joined together, the buildings in the crime-ridden neighborhood are slated for demolition at the end of June. The words on the last house come from Mr Chris, a past resident of the neighborhood who in response to questions from concerned people about why he wouldn’t move from the dangerous block said “I am here because its home.” A Love Letter to Baltimore, indeed.

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A Closer Look at the HIGH Kite & Journey Tube

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A traditional diamond kite with a bong carrying case, the HIGH Kite & Journey Tube are handcrafted objects that push the boundaries of adult entertainment. Hand-stitched out of ripstop nylon by Miami-based master kite-maker Dan Ward, the 32” HIGH Kite is a statement in the sky. Literally embracing the century-old phrase “high as a kite” while referencing the kite as a means of advertising in the same era, the HIGH kite celebrates the lifted. With a stylistic nod to the legendary acrylic Tobacco Master Water Pipe, the Journey Tube is a 39-inch, fully functional travel case designed in partnership with Brooklyn-based industrial design studio The Principals. This edition is made with the intention for its users to spend time outdoors—a luxurious opportunity in the modern world. The HIGH Kite & Journey Tube launch exclusively in-store and online at Paul Kasmin Gallery’s PK Shop, and retail for $400 in an edition of 20.

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Neanderthal Jeans

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Eddie Martinez opens up a show of brilliant new paintings and sculptures tonight on the Upper East Side at Half Gallery.

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The Art of Tuning Back In: An Interview with Daniel Arnold

Daniel Arnold tirelessly captures and catalogs the serendipity and the strange goings-on in and around New York City’s streets every day. Roaming the landscape so we don’t have to, Arnold presents these images to the world in a constant live stream of photographs from his brain to your eyes, via his website and popular Instagram account. He works so determinedly and creates so much great work that he’s become somewhat of a New York City fixture himself, not just documenting the fabric of the city, but becoming part of it. So, what happens when he’s dropped into the middle of another city for six short days and tasked with making the same magic happen there too? From the looks of Arnold’s new show, Six Days in San Francisco, now on view at Wolfe Contemporary, the same amazing things. Shot, processed, printed, framed, and hung all in less than a week, the show highlights the similar trappings of oddness, sadness, humor, and beauty that his New York work does, while exposing new ideas about the city and about documenting the unexpected and unknown. I hunted down Daniel for some insights into the whole process.

—Christian

 
 
Christian Storm: How did the whole show in San Francisco come about?

Daniel Arnold: I was in a group show at the Wolfe Contemporary Gallery about a year ago, which was kind of an anomaly for them. They usually show painters but the guy who runs it has an assistant who, because it’s a smaller operation, is more involved than most, and she was following me on Instagram and recommended me for the show. So, some time went by and they had an opening out of nowhere and they offered me a solo show. It was very short notice and I could have taken an easy route, but it happened that I was going be in LA around that time. I went out to San Francisco ten days before the show and I figured I’d make it interesting and try to shoot the whole thing there.
 
That’s crazy. What was that pressure like to shoot a whole show in such a short amount of time? It’s definitely different than the way you work normally, I assume.

It was really hard. I guess I didn’t really understand what high stakes I was setting for myself. I’ve been in a rhythm of producing so much work on a regular basis, basically every day, that I felt fairly confident that I could just show up and make it happen. But the combination of being a stranger in town and sleeping on assorted couches and going three days at a time without being able to change my clothes and just walking all day, every day- I have a pedometer on my phone and by the end, I had walked 100 miles- was tough. It was a huge physical exertion and a bit of a psychological trial too, but it ultimately ended up being so much more rewarding for that. I think my outsider take on such recent times made for a more interesting, engaging show. I’ve always been a big fan of San Francisco but I’ve never had a real proper look around and it was a great way to experience the city.
 
You talk about viewing San Francisco from a fresh viewpoint. When you’re photographing in a city, how much about the work is about the specific city itself, and how much of is it about humans in general?

For the most part, the differences between cities in my photos are pretty subtle. It didn’t feel like a gimmicky change of pace for me, like I was finding people in Giants hats or eating sourdough bread. A lot of the New York stuff, pretty much the whole past few years, has been a product of loneliness and walking around, feeling kind of bummed, tuning out my own life and getting tuned into my surroundings. San Francisco provided plenty of loneliness. That downtrodden feeling wasn’t hard to come by in a place where I was disoriented and walking uphill all day. I found San Francisco to be much wilder and more threatening than New York, and I think that came through in some of it. The spirit there is much closer to surface than in New York, where people are much more calculated and manicured. But for the most part, the experience was very similar. It was just fresher because it was new; I could see things a little more clearly.
 

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