Tonight, Uptown

harmony-korine-shooters

“Shooters,” an exhibition of recent paintings by Harmony Korine at Gagosian.

Building Heads

matt-leines-building-head-drawing

Matt Leines has once again dug into the archive of his my mind to offer up for one week only original drawings of his classic “Building Head.” Matt hasn’t made this type of drawing in over ten years, so it is definitely a must-have, unique piece for your growing art collection.

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Installation View: Ryan Travis Christian – Check please!

On view at Western Exhibitions in Chicago through June 6th, 2014

Printables

father-of-claymation

How the Father of Claymation Lost His Company by Zachary Crockett

Will Vinton brought clay to life with characters like the California Raisins and the Noid — until Nike billionaire Phil Knight stepped in and bought the business for his son, rapper Chilly Tee.

I Beg You To Take Me Seriously

chris-johanson-skate-deck

Preorder a new collaborative art skate deck by Chris Johanson and Art Department PDX. Limited to an edition of 30

Excellence Comes Only After Years of Toil

The Gun Maker

via, doobybrain

Part of That Jam Band Lifestyle

peter-sutherland-hacky-sacks-grateful-death-row

Hacky Sacks by Peter Sutherland

Board Ideas

For all the young skate fanatics out there, unused sketches for skateboard decks by Mark Mulroney.

‘Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left behind by those who hustle’

banksy-note-boys-club

Banksy donates an artwork taken off of the street by the leader of Bristol Boys Club to the Bristol Boys Club, to do with it as they see fit.

Selfish Selfies: An Interview with Nick Sethi

The cool thing about Nick Sethi is that he’s not fucking around. He might trick you into thinking he is, as his photocopied zines full of gritty, funny snapshots employ the same visual language as the guy at the house party with a tall boy in one hand and a camera in the other. But there’s more there; He’s trying to make the drunk skater kids think. Whether he’s photographing poverty-stricken kids living under a freeway in New Delhi or himself posing for the camera at Hollister in the mall, he turns that vernacular aesthetic into a vehicle for deeper concepts about art, identity, and truth, using the style to break down the wall between artist and viewer while retaining all the fun that comes with it. His recent show at Ed. Varie continued these ideas, displaying found self-portraits of women in tanning beds, further blurring the distinctions of authorship and curated individuality. I caught up with Nick to see what was up.

—Christian

 
 

Christian Storm: Your recent show at Ed. Varie was all about “selfies” and your own work, especially your crazy instagram account and your zine, HCO, includes a ton of selfies of you own. What is it about selfies that interests you so much? You seem to both celebrate and also question the ideas they project.

Nick Sethi: Selfies are the highest form of art. Art is the most personal and selfish thing one can create, and selfies embody this to the fullest. Like art, they are put out for others to view, but they are created for the self. They are totally accessible to most people and constantly being created and they ride these lines between self-expression and self-reflection, exhibition and voyeurism, and the true self versus the ideal self, all carefully created yet made to look effortless. To me, they blur art and life and turn it into one constant performance. I love thinking about it because it’s so deep and crazy.
 
Yeah, a lot of your work seems to be about those ideas and the ways in which we choose to outwardly display ourselves and define who we are. Selfies of course, but also tattoos and patches on jackets, et cetera. Often, even your own identity as the artist is apparent, since most of your stuff includes a shot or two of yourself, further blurring the lines. Can you talk a little bit about the role that the concept of identity plays in your work?

I don’t believe there is any sort of objectivity in art. The same way people create and project an identity that they want the world to recognize, all artists inject their views into what they are creating. I am present in everything I create, and choosing to physically put myself in the work avoids any sort of confusion, and allows me to be super blatant about what I’m trying to convey. It’s the easiest and truest way for me to be honest with the fact that I’m commenting on myself, as well the world around me.
 
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Printables

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The Complete History of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Rob Lammle

Struggling artists Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird were living in Northampton, Massachusetts, when they came up with the Turtles in November 1983. As a joke, Eastman drew a turtle standing on its hind legs, wearing a mask, with nunchucks strapped to its arms. Eastman wrote “Ninja Turtle” on the top of the page. Laird laughed and then drew a more refined version of the turtle. Not to be outdone, Eastman drew four turtles, each armed with a ninja-style weapon. Laird outlined the group shot in ink and added “Teenage Mutant” to the “Ninja Turtles” title.

Openings & Parties: 2014 CREATIVE TIME Spring Gala Honoring Kara Walker

Last night, over 700 high-profile guests enjoyed a sneak-peek of Kara Walker’s A Subtlety, her first large-scale public project that sits inside Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory. Supported by Creative Time, attendees to the gala danced to a set by the legendary DJ Afrika Bambaataa and sipped Absolut Elyx cocktails out of tin bottles inspired by the space’s industrial past. With the goal of supporting the New York-based nonprofit, over $1.3 Million dollars was raised, ensuring a continued legacy in the arts. For those wishing to see Kara Walker’s enormous homage to the sphinx, A Subtlety goes on view to the public beginning this Friday, May 10th 2014.

Photos by Christos Katsiaouni

LU.CU.MA is a Tough One

Once a blood thirsty criminal in jail for 27 years, Peruvian artist LU.CU.MA is content now with just making pictures.

Printables

cool-graffiti

The New Must-Have for Luxury Buildings: Graffiti by Elizabeth Greenspan

Graffiti is used to sell lots of things, of course. In the nineties, Nike and Coca-Cola began hiring well-known graffiti artists to paint large-scale murals and to help design advertising campaigns targeted at young people. Other industries—fashion, vodka, fast food—followed. But the real-estate industry’s use of graffiti is different; after all, taggers don’t vandalize sneakers. Historically, property owners and developers have tended to consider graffiti a sign of decay that lowers property values. But that was before people started finding grittiness really cool.

The Absolute Worst Video Containing Both Art and Skateboarding

Shown only so that you can get disgusted, laugh and shake your head at whoever thought this was a good idea, and then feel content with yourself by pressing the stop button and knowing that you could do better.

Art Openings in New York This Week

jayson-musson

Jayson Musson
Exhibit of Abstract Art
May 07, 2014–June 21, 2014

Opening Reception: 6 – 8pm

SALON 94
243 Bowery
New York, NY 10002

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For the Digital Artist with Analog Tendencies

rotring-800-mechanical-pencil-stylus

With a solid twist to the red ring, the rOtring 800+ goes from confident metal stylus to exceptional mechanical pencil. Founded in Hamburg, Germany in 1928 during the Bauhaus period, rOtring has a long tradition of making some of the finest technical writing and drawing instruments, and this hybrid advancement helps move them securely into the digital age. Sitting firmly in your hand, the rOtring 800+ is a perfect tool for those who like consistency whether sketching on paper or plastic. It’s everything that you’d expect from an $85 price tag.

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Buck Shots

A look through Peter Sutherland’s 2007 book featuring photographs of deer in Colorado, California, Utah, New York, Pennsylvania, Washington, Vermont and New Zealand between 2002 and 2007.

Printables

dan-colen-ari-marcopoulos

The Life And Times Of Dan Colen by Andrew Goldman

The quintessential art-world bad boy boozed, brawled, and snorted his way through the 2000s—and somehow survived to tell the tale. His work has been savaged by critics—and with each skewering, his popularity and prices have soared. Now, with two new high-profile exhibitions, the 34-year-old is primed for his next act and trying to make sense of his darkly charmed existence.

photo by Ari Marcopoulos

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