Chillin’ For The Weekend

A Taze and a Beatdown

In weird police chases caught on film that end predictably, San Bernandino’s finest assault a suspect who tried to getaway on a stolen horse.

All The Cute and Fuzzy Bunnies

SERRANO-ANGORA

Andres Serrano goes to the National Angora Show to photograph some rabbits in a perfectly timed piece for the NY Times Magazine.

For those wanting to head upstate for a little quality time with some angora furrballs, this is just the place.

In Dogs We Trust: An Interview With Will Robson-Scott & Ollie Grove

The truth of the internet is that it skews terribly towards cats. Today it does not. Here, Alix McAlpine interviews Will Robson-Scott and Ollie Grove about their new book In Dogs We Trust, which spans both sides of the Atlantic to look at the relationships between dogs and their owners.

Alix: I’ve been following you on instagram for a while so dogs as a subject matter doesn’t really surprise me since you post a fair amount of dog pics – did you always have dogs growing up, do you have one now or are you just a dog appreciator?

WRS: Me and Ollie both grew up with dogs, Rusty was my first family dog, a cairn terrier, he was highly excitable and now my parents have Milo, a miniature schnauzer , I’m not responsible enough to own one myself and living in nyc and travelling a lot isn’t a perfect marriage.I prefer dogs to humans.

How did you go about selecting your potential subjects?

WRS: With this sort of project theres a snow ball effect , one person leads to another. The interesting thing about shooting dogs is that people open there door to you and let their guard down. People are proud of their dog similarly to having a family photograph taken. People in the lime light are always a bit more weary of having there photograph taken in intimate situations, but having a canine involved breaks down that barrier

Was there a particular breed of dogs you saw most? Is there a breed-to-occupation or breed-to-region correlation?

WRS: There are definitely dogs that are more “in trend” , you come across a lot of french bulldog and pits/staffies . There is defiantly a trend of west coast bullie(pit bull) breeders, that is comparable to west coast car culture.

Ollie: Staffordshires are the dogs of the uk, loved by as many people as they are feared. Everyone knows of them and everyone has an opinion.
If we didn’t have the dangerous dogs act in the UK then i think we would have a much larger collection of pitbulls which are seen as a loving family dog in the US but as a loaded gun in the UK.

What’s the most extravagant owner behavior you saw? Any ridiculous dog treatment?

WRS: We shot an artist in London called David Harrison, his dogs name is ‘Mr Harrison,” Davids bedroom is like a boudoir from 100 years ago. Attack pit bull training is something to be seen, the dog is triggered by a word, any word and then basically won’t stoop attacking until its called off or gives itself a heart attack

Ollie: There was one dog which i’m convinced got involved in the bedroom of the owners but i’ll refrain from putting a name or breed to them

Some people might see this project as a departure from your previous published work but, it seems you’ve been working on it the whole while. What were some of the challenges or particularities of shifting between projects and making sure this didn’t fall through the cracks?

WRS: Me and Ollie are still actually shooting this project, the book being published was going to be the end of it, but its a project you can stop and start and its something we both enjoy, it makes sense to keep building on it. As far from it being a departure from other work i don’t think it is. It might seem a bit more subdued, but all my work is about people and how they interact with the world and this is very much about that.

Any tips for photographing dogs you could share?

WRS: Get the human in the shot to stay engaged with the camera and then get the dogs attention ,if the human is trying to help get its attention it never works out.

How many dog shits were you subjected to while shooting?

WRS: I don’t think we had many issues with dog shits to be honest.

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“World’s Best” Pig Squealer

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French truck driver Noël “Nono” Jamet took home first prize for the sixth year in a row for his pig impression at France’s annual agricultural fair in Paris.

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Harbor Seal VS Giant Octopus

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A ten minute battle off the coast of Victoria, Canada caught on camera by amateur photographer Bob Ianson.

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Samurai Siamese

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Canadian sculptor Jeff de Boer makes ridiculously awesome suits of armor for cats.

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In Dog We Trust

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The company that made these feature rugs for the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office in Florida is about to get an obedience lesson.

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Wallace’s flying frog

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Odd Creatures is a recurring column about the world’s weirdest species written by award-winning science writer and author Bec Crew, and illustrated by the super-talented Aiyana Udesen

Why hop when you can fly? Meet Wallace’s flying frog (Rhacophorus nigropalmatus), a large, pretty species found in tropical jungles of Malaysia, Borneo and western Indonesia.

Just a bit smaller than the length of an iPhone, the species sports a bright, shiny green colouring with a yellow underbelly and black webbing between its yellow fingers and toes. It might be called a flying frog, but technically what it does is glide. Flying needs to be powered by something like regular wing movements or a motor, whereas gliding is more like… falling with style. Just as if it were parachuting, a gliding animal will make a slow descent to where it needs to be at an angle of no more than 45 degrees relative to the ground below.

Wallace’s flying frog is so good at this, it can glide as far forward as the distance it’s falling. This means that if one is launching itself from a height of 15 metres (49 feet), it’s capable of gliding at least 15 metres away from that spot, aided by some weird, aerodynamic skin flaps on its sides, and its enormous and extensively webbed feet and hands. These things are literally bigger than its head.

The thin black membrane that forms the webbing on a Wallace’s flying frog’s hands and feet stays folded up when the frog is at rest, and stretches out like a parachute when it launches itself into the air. When the frog is ready to land, its enlarged toe pads help it to grip instantly onto the surface of a tree, or will cushion its landing once it reaches the jungle floor.

Wallace’s flying frog was first discovered in 1855 and named by British naturalist, Alfred Russel Wallace. At the time, it was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. In fact, the existence of a frog that had grown beyond leaping and into something far more effective helped Charles Darwin form the beginnings of his theory of evolution by natural selection. Poor old Wallace had been in the process of formulating his own very similar theory, but threw the towel in once Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859.

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Lunchtime Laughter

Dogs So Excited at the Holidays They Explode!

A Drone Attack from Kangaroo Jack

Alaska’s Party Animal

buzzwinkle

Remembering Buzzwinkle, the drunkest moose in Anchorage.

“the massive bull was standing rigid, knees locked, with his wide-set eyes fixed in an inscrutable expression. A long strand of small white lights tangled in his antlers attested to some careless twig noshing in Town Square earlier in the day. The most obvious sign of life was the cloud of vapor venting from his nostrils with every deep exhalation. He was blotto, and he knew it.”

Frostbitten Flamingoes

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Flying the wrong way due to “unusual climactic conditions,” four different flamingoes flapped their way into Siberia last week.

Rest in Purrs to the World’s Oldest two-faced Cat

frank-louie-janus-cat-two-faces

Frank and Louie aka “Frankenlouie” was 15 years old.

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A New Species Of Frog Discovered in New Jersey Actually Sounds Like Jersey

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The Atlantic Coast leopard frog is distinguishable from other frogs because of the groaning and coughing sounds it makes.

Pigbutt worm

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Odd Creatures is a recurring column about the world’s weirdest species written by award-winning science writer and author Bec Crew, and illustrated by the super-talented Aiyana Udesen

 

Look at this animal. Just look at it. It’s glorious.

Found almost a kilometer below the surface of the ocean, this hazelnut-sized marine worm lives, breathes, and floats around looking exactly like a tiny, perfectly plump rear end.

The species was discovered floating freely through the ocean in 2006 by a remotely operated vehicle off the coast of California. This little submerged research robot scooped up a handful of pigbutt worms, and Karen Osborn, a marine biologist from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, got to analyze and name them. So she called them Chaetopterus pugaporcinus, which in Latin literally means “worm that looks like a pig’s rump”.

This otherworldly purplish bubble creature with its pink, puckered mouth is unlike any other species of worm ever found. In trying to figure out what the pigbutt worm’s deal is, Osborn compared her specimens to several other known species of marine worm. She was able to find some physical similarities between her pigbutt worms and the larvae – or young – of a large family of marine worms worms called Chaetopteridae, so perhaps, she thought, her pigbutt worms were in their juvenile form?

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“I Had Animals as Friends…”

Not just Ghost Dog, either. Here’s RZA for PETA.

 

Lurking in the Darkness Below

The scariest and most fascinating thing about the ocean is that you never really know what’s underneath you. Here’s some footage of the very rare “black sea devil” anglerfish swimming about at a depth of 600 meters. It uses a “flashlight” on its head to attract its prey and is one of the cuter fish in existence…

Imagination Runs Wild

You Seen My Goat? by Robert Rafalat and Alex Kirkland

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